Singapore: Competition and Consumer Commission of Singapore
Singapore
Abstract Shape Background
Singapore: Competition and Consumer Commission of Singapore

Singapore: Competition and Consumer Commission of Singapore

Singapore

Singapore: from the enforcer

Address: 45 Maxwell Road, #09-01,
The URA Centre, Singapore 069118
Tel: +65 6325 8200
Fax: +65 6224 6929
Email: [email protected]
Web: ww.cccs.gov.sgw

Contacts

Aubeck Kam
Chairman

Sia AikKor
Chief Executive

Questions and answers

How long is the head of agency’s term of office?

The Ministry of Trade and Industry appoints members to the Competition and Consumer Commission of Singapore (CCCS), including the chairman. Each term of office is no less than three years and no more than five years, and the ministry may reappoint CCCS members for a new term.

When is he or she due for reappointment?

The chairman was appointed for three years beginning 1 January 2015. The term has been renewed for an additional three years beginning 1 January 2018.

Which posts within the organisation are political appointments?

No positions within the agency are political appointments.

What is the agency’s annual budget?

The total approved operating budget for the 2019 fiscal year was approximately S$19.93 million.

How many staff are employed by the agency?

The CCCS has about 73 staff as at1 August 2020.

To whom does the head of the agency report?

The chairman of the CCCS is appointed by the Ministry of Trade and Industry. The CCCS decides on cases independently. Appeals against the decisions of the CCCS go to an independent Competition Appeal Board.

For corporate accountability, the CCCS is required to submit a copy of its audited financial statements and an auditor report to the ministry for presentation to parliament.

Do any industry-specific regulators have competition powers?

Yes. Some sectors, such as energy, media and telecommunications, have jurisdictions over matters relating to competition in those sectors.

If so, how do these relate to your role?

When the Competition Act came into force, a number of sectors and activities were excluded from the act for two main reasons:

  • public interests considerations (for example, national security, defence, to ensure security takes precedence over economic considerations); and
  • sectors in transition from a monopoly to a liberalised market.

Sectoral regulators, with their greater domain knowledge and expertise, are deemed to be better placed to address and balance competition issues with other policy concerns using their own competition frameworks.

Where there are cross-sectoral competition issues, they will be dealt with by the CCCS in consultation with the relevant sectoral regulators.

Do politicians have any right to overrule or disregard the decisions of the authority?

Under the Competition Act, the decisions of the CCCS are independent and not subject to the scrutiny of politicians. Parties have the right to appeal against the CCCS’s decisions to an independently appointed Competition Appeal Board. They can also appeal against a decision of the Competition Appeal Board to the High Court and Court of Appeal on a point of law arising from a decision of the board, or from any decision of the board as to the amount of a financial penalty. There are also rights of private action provided for under the Competition Act.

Does the law allow non-competition aims to be considered when taking decisions?

In enforcing the Competition Act, the CCCS takes into consideration harm on the competitive process in a market caused by a particular conduct. However, the Competition Act also allows for exemptions or exclusions for certain practices and conduct based on public interest or policy considerations, net economic benefit or net efficiencies arguments.

Which body hears appeals against the agency’s decisions? Is there any form of judicial review beyond that mentioned above? If so, which body conducts this?

Parties have the right to appeal against the CCCS’s decisions to the Competition Appeal Board (CAB). The CAB isan independent body comprising members appointed by the Minister for Trade and Industry. Parties can alsoappeal against a decision of the Competition Appeal Board to the High Court and subsequently to the Court ofAppeal on a point of law, or as to the amount of a financial penalty. There are also rights of private action providedfor under the Competition Act.

Has the authority ever blocked a proposed merger?

Yes. In 2018, CCCS issued a Statement of Decision (Provisional) to the parties, finding that the proposedacquisition was likely to result in the substantial lessening of competition in the market for the supply of marinewater treatment chemicals in Singapore. The proposed transaction was subsequently abandoned by the parties,and the notification was withdrawn.

Has the authority ever imposed conditions on a proposed merger?

Yes. One recent example involves a merger involving private clinical laboratories. CCCS conditionally approvedthe merger of two private clinical laboratories after accepting commitments from the merged entity. The conditionscommitted by the merged entity applies for fouryears and include: ensuring other competing labs have access totesting services supplied by the merged party on a fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory basis; allowingcontracted customers to switch to other suppliers; allowing early termination of contracts without cause subject toa prior written notice and requiring the merged entity to maintain its prices for certain types of customers.

Has the authority conducted a Phase II investigation in any of its merger filings?

Yes.

Has the authority ever pursued a company based outside your jurisdiction for a cartel offence?

An agreement which has as its object or effect the prevention, restriction or distortion of competition withinSingapore is prohibited, even if the agreement is entered into outside Singapore or if a party to such agreement isoutside Singapore. To date, CCCS has three cases involving global cartels. The most recent case took place inJanuary 2018 when the CCCS issued an infringement decision against five capacitor manufacturers for engagingin price-fixing and the exchange of confidential sales, distribution and pricing information for aluminium electrolyticcapacitors. Among the companies that were found to have infringed the Competition Act, one involved aMalaysian company.

Do you operate a leniency programme? Whom should potential applicants contact?

The CCCS has a leniency programme as part of its enforcement strategy. It is targeted at businesses that haveparticipated in cartel activities,but would nevertheless like to cease their cartel involvement and provide the CCCSwith the evidence of the cartel activity. A successful leniency applicant that meets the conditions of the programme(including being the first one to come forward) may be granted immunity from financial penalties. Other applicantsthat do not qualify for total immunity may benefit from a reduction in financial penalties. In addition, CCCS also operates a leniency plus programme that incentivises businesses that are co-operatingwith CCCS in a cartel investigation in one market (the first market) to inform CCCS about their participation in acompletely separate cartel in another market (the second market). A successful applicant that is the first one tocome forward may be granted immunity or up to 100 per centreduction from financial penalties in relation to the cartel inthe second market and it will also be granted a reduction in the financial penalties, if any, imposed against it in theinvestigation in the cartel in the first market.Potential applicants can reach CCCS via the following methods:

Is there a criminal enforcement track? If so, who is responsible for it?

No.

Are there any plans to reform the competition law?

CCCS continually reviews the Competition Act to ensure that it is relevant and up-to-date. Our most recentlycompleted review was completed in May 2018, when the Competition (Amendment) Act came into effect. Amongthe main changes to the Act are: (ai) changes to empower CCCS to accept legally binding and enforceablecommitments for anti-competitive conduct relating to sections 34 and 47 prohibitions so as to address and resolvethe competition concerns arising from the conduct; (ii) streamlining and simplification of the interview process byallowing CCCS to conduct general interviews during inspections and searches under section 64 and section 65 of the Act respectively; (iii) to provide more certainty to businesses and stakeholders by providing for confidentialadvice for anticipated mergers under the Act.

When did the last review of the law occur?

Please refer to above.

Do you have a separate economics team? If so please give details.

Economists are in the Business and Economics (BE) Division and the Policy and Markets (PM) Division.

The BE Division provides expert economics inputs and analysis to investigations and competition cases.

The PM Division works closely with other government agencies to engage and advise them on national competition matters. In addition, the PM Division conducts market studies and collaborates with academic and research institutions and think tanks on suitable areas of research on competition policy and law.

Has the authority conducted a dawn raid?

Yes.

Has the authority imposed penalties on officers or directors of companies for offences committed by the company?

No.

What are the pre-merger notification thresholds, if any, for the buyer and seller involved in a merger?

Not applicable. Singapore has a voluntary merger regime.

Are there any restrictions on minority investments?

In general, the CCCS considers that a merger is unlikely to reduce in a substantial lessening of competition (SLC) and hence is unlikely to investigate unless:

  • the merged entity will have a market share of 40 per cent or more; or
  • the merged entity will have a market share of between 20 and 40 per cent, and the post-merger combined market share of the largest firms (concentration ratio of 3) is 70 per cent or more.

These thresholds are only indicative, and if necessary, the CCCS can carry out an assessment to determine whether a merger will substantially lessen competition. In an SLC test, the CCCS will evaluate the prospects for competition in the future with and without the merger, and to consider efficiency arguments where available.

Does the authority conduct criminal investigations and prosecutions for cartel activity? If not, is there another authority in the country that does?

No.


Singapore: from the enforcer's competition economists

Address: 45 Maxwell Road, #09-01, The URA Centre, Singapore 069118
Tel: +1800 325 8282
Fax: +65 6224 6929
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.cccs.gov.sg

Questions and answers

How many economists do you employ?

There are currently about 25 economists in the Competition and Consumer Commission of Singapore (CCCS). In addition, one Commission member is a professor of economics at Nanyang Technological University.

Do you have a separate economics unit, or ‘bureau’?

The Business and Economics (BE) Division and the Policy and Markets (PM) Division are staffed with economists. The BE Division provides expert economics inputs and analysis to competition and consumer cases, while the PM Division engages other government agencies closely and advises them on competition matters. In addition, the PM Division conducts market studies and collaborates with academic and research institutions and think tanks on research relating to competition and consumer protection policy, economics and law.

The CCCS does not consider economists as separate, independent advisers. Economists can be appointed to senior management positions. They also work together with lawyers and policy generalists to carry out investigation work, conduct market studies and to reach out to businesses, government bodies and other key stakeholders.

Do you have a chief economist?

The CCCS does not have such a post but does have the post of assistant chief executive of the Policy, Business and Economics Division. The assistant chief executive oversees the work of the BE Division and PM Division.

To whom does the chief economist report?

The assistant chief executive reports directly to the chief executive of the CCCS.

Does the chief economist have the power to hire his or her own staff?

The hiring of any economist is decided by an interview panel comprising:

  • the chief executive;
  • the assistant chief executive of the Policy, Business and Economics Division;
  • senior director of the Business and Economics Division or the director of the Policy and Markets Division;
  • the director of the Corporate Affairs Division; and
  • any other management staff whom the chief executive may assign to be in the interview panel.

How many economists have a PhD in industrial economics?

One.

Does the agency include a specialist economist on every case team? If not, why not?

Generally, every case team comprises personnel from the Legal and Enforcement Division and, depending on the nature of the case, economists from either the BE Division or the PM Division will be included to ensure professional inputs from both the legal and economic perspectives.

How much economics work is outsourced? What type of work is outsourced?

The CCCS hires external consultants as necessary, such as for a market study in an industry requiring specialised and technical expertise or to get an independent expert’s assessment of certain aspects of a competition or consumer case.

View all profiles

Get unlimited access to all Global Competition Review content