GCR 100 - 18th Edition

United States: Washington, DC

10 January 2018

United States: Washington, DC

As Washington, DC is roiled by political turmoil, its antitrust bar remains deeply rooted and largely stable – as well as the biggest and arguably most important in the world

Elite

Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton “is the best firm in the world,” says one competitor, and “second to none in DC”. The firm’s nine full-time antitrust partners include long-time leaders of the bar such as George Cary, as well as the “great” David Gelfand, who returned in July 2016 after overseeing the Antitrust Division’s litigation for three years, and “strong, experienced young partners” such as Elaine Ewing. Kenneth Reinker and Daniel Culley were elected to the partnership in January 2017. After labouring as managing partner of the firm for six years, Mark Leddy has downshifted to the role of senior counsel.

Cary and Ewing teamed up to win conditional FTC clearance of Abbott Laboratories’ US$25 billion purchase of medical device maker St Jude Medical, and from the DOJ of Dow Chemical’s US$130 billion tie-up with DuPont. Brian Byrne and Mark Leddy advised divestiture buyer MolsonCoors in the Anheuser Busch InBev/SABMiller beer blockbuster. Other major recent deals include Air Liquide/Airgas, cleared by the FTC in less than six months and with a more limited divestiture than the merger agreement anticipated; Western Digital/SanDisk, which passed through the FTC without a second request; and Essilor’s US$49 billion acquisition of eyewear maker Luxottica, which has gone to a second request in multiple jurisdictions.

In the past year, the firm saw a string of litigation victories as well. Cary worked with Leah Brannon to defend Sanofi’s loyalty discounts against a competitor’s monopolisation claim at trial and on appeal. The two also defeated regulations by the Texas Medical Board that would have gutted their client Teladoc’s business model – the state has now passed legislation to enable telehealth providers. In the roll-on-roll-off vehicle shipping follow-on action, Mark Nelson and Jeremy Calsyn kept their district court win on appeal; they successfully argued that despite guilty pleas, follow-on damages were blocked by the Shipping Act of 1984. Even where Cleary lost, it limited the loss, as in US Airways’ jury verdict finding Sabre liable for damages – but less than 2% of what the airline originally claimed. Various partners counsel Citigroup, HSBC and Goldman Sachs in the many government investigations and civil litigations aimed at financial institutions.

OUTSTANDING

Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer has benefited from the end of the Obama administration by regaining three antitrust partners in Washington, DC who had been in government since 2013: William Baer and Sonia Pfaffenroth at the Antitrust Division, and Deborah Feinstein at the FTC. Their returns will boost a group that had maintained a high standing in their absence. “We are as busy as we ever have been,” says Jonathan Gleklen, who handed off the role of practice chair to Feinstein in September.

Gleklen was the DC antitrust lead for General Electric’s acquisition of Baker Hughes, which the DOJ cleared with a chunky divestiture in June 2017. Along with Peter Levitas and Barbara Wootton, he is advising Monsanto on a proposed US$66 billion acquisition by Bayer that remains under review after a lengthy second request. With Wootton leading the team, Arnold & Porter was among the trio of firms representing Monsanto on the now-abandoned sale of its Precision Planting business to Deere.

After winning unconditional clearance for AT&T’s purchase of satellite TV provider DirecTV in 2015, Richard Rosen and Maureen Jeffreys are now aiding the telecommunications giant in its heavily scrutinised tie-up with media conglomerate Time Warner. “If I’m getting sued, I want Rich Rosen to represent me,” a partner at another antitrust group says, and others feel the same way. Rosen advised Cigna in its blocked acquisition by Anthem. Quieter merger matters include Wilson Mudge’s early termination for Komatsu/Joy Global, and Michael Bernstein guiding AMC Theaters through a divestiture-conditioned approval of its purchase of Carmike Cinemas. Mark Merley represents Visa in the ATM fee litigation, which was nearly heard by the Supreme Court; back in district court in 2017, the defendants beat ATM operators’ bid for a preliminary injunction. When Arnold & Porter completed its own merger with Kaye Scholer in January 2017, it gained pharmaceutical specialist Laura Shores, who helped a New York-based team fend off a monopolisation suit against Novartis.

The quality of Baker Botts’ litigators is reflected in the FTC’s penchant for stealing them. Just before Stephen Weissman’s return to the firm in late 2015, partner Charles Loughlin left to serve as the agency’s chief trial counsel, and in January 2017 Thomas Dillickrath became Loughlin’s deputy. Practice chairs Weissman and John Taladay say they are “in hiring mode,” as the firm invests in a profitable antitrust group that has doubled in revenues and size since it began as a refuge from Howrey. Before he retired in January, William Henry helped to counsel Boehringer Ingelheim in its US$12.6 billion asset swap with Sanofi.

When lawyers at this Texas-born firm talk about a “full pipeline” of work, it has a more literal meaning than it may elsewhere. Though low oil prices and a DOJ challenge cut off Halliburton’s attempt to buy rival Baker Hughes, other deals still demand a defence. Having spent months convincing the FTC to allow Valero Energy’s purchase of two petroleum storage terminals from Plains All American Pipeline, Weissman and Michael Perry beat the California attorney general’s attempt to enjoin it preliminarily. The companies were not required to remain separate during the litigation, but ultimately chose to drop the deal before a full trial on the merits. Perry, along with Sean FX Boland and Paul Cuomo, counselled Rockwater Energy Solutions’ sale to Select Energy Services. In another aspect of the energy industry, Joseph Ostoyich represented Waste Control Specialists as it went to trial in Delaware – but failed – to save its tie-up with rival nuclear waste disposer EnergySolutions. Further merger work includes Cuomo acting for Liberty Media on multiple deals, such as its US$8 billion purchase of Formula One.

Baker Botts boasts a strong portfolio of non-merger work, too. James Kress is defending patent assertion entity Conversant against Apple’s panoply of antitrust claims, and he and Cuomo have fended off SawStop’s lawsuit against table-saw makers Milwaukee Electric Tool, One World Technologies and Ryobi Technologies. In addition to defending McWane from litigation following on from the FTC’s case against the pipe maker, Ostoyich and William Lavery are acting for a plaintiff aluminium producer that sued the South Carolina Public Service Authority for an allegedly anticompetitive monopoly on electrical power supply. The firm is coordinating counsel for global auto parts probes of Toyoda Gosei, and Taladay leads the team acting for the International Air Transport Association as a complainant to the European Commission.

Some of the best antitrust lawyers in Washington, DC say they would call Covington & Burling, especially when negotiating with a Republican administration, thanks to a practice chaired by two partners who led the Antitrust Division during the George W Bush administration. Thomas Barnett is “a serious antitrust lawyer who knows what he’s doing,” and his peers at other firms report only good experiences working with him. He talks up the firm’s focus on promoting from within its “embarrassment of riches of young and mid-level associates who are outstanding”; Henry Liu was made a partner in October 2016. Co-chair Deborah Garza also earns plaudits as a “terrific” mergers and cartels lawyer, who led a group convened by the Chamber of Commerce to offer advice to Congress and the president about trade policy and antitrust.

While some clients remain confidential, the firm seems to be involved in most major Antitrust Division probes, ranging from the long-running auto parts cartel to the newer inquiry into generic drugmakers. Garza prides herself on helping clients avoid charges or guilty pleas, such as Sandridge Energy avoiding an indictment in an alleged two-company conspiracy to keep down the price for oil-and-gas leases, despite a grand jury’s indictment of the leniency applicant’s former chief executive. Cartel defence in turn leads to defence against the follow-on litigation, which Covington handles for multiple clients in financial benchmarks: Alan Wiseman, Thomas Isaacson, Andrew Lazerow and Jonathan Gimblett for Citigroup in the London Inter-Bank Offered Rate; Robert Wick for JPMorgan Chase in aluminium warehousing and interest rate swaps. Garza and Isaacson pitched in on the West Coast case brought against animation studios by animators alleging a no-poaching conspiracy; Disney, Lucasfilm, Pixar and Two Pic MC settled for US$100 million in February 2017.

Lately, the firm’s specialty in mergers appears to be those with few overlaps that nonetheless raise controversy. Garza acts for Tribune Media in its sale to conservative Sinclair Broadcast Group; Barnett is aiding Amazon in its acquisition of Whole Foods; and he and James O’Connell guided Verizon in its purchase of Yahoo!, which finally closed in June 2017. O’Connell also represents Chinese steelmakers accused by US Steel of fixing prices.

Dechert is a “very strong practice,” its rivals say, and Paul Denis and Paul Friedman “are both really great lawyers”. The firm brings decades of industry expertise to the entire food chain, from seeds to supermarkets. It is also long-time counsel to US Airways – now under its post-merger name American Airlines, and needing competition arguments for various allocations of slots and joint ventures, plus defence against a DOJ investigation of possible collusion and the damages claim that followed. At the time of writing, Steven Bradbury still awaited confirmation to become general counsel to the Department of Transportation.

Friedman worked with colleagues in the firm’s home office of Philadelphia to defend Dean Foods against a putative class action in which the last plaintiff ultimately settled on the eve of trial in March 2017. Bradbury did the same in defending Curtis Circulation, which obtained summary judgment against accusations of a group boycott; a Second Circuit appeal is pending. Dechert, a self-described “destination shop for contested mergers”, acted for General Electric in its attempt to sell its appliance division to Electrolux, and Friedman and Michael Weiner were lead trial counsel for Monsanto in its attempt to sell its Precision Planting business to Deere & Co. The companies abandoned both deals after DOJ lawsuits.

In more positive interactions with the Antitrust Division, Denis and Craig Falls obtained conditional clearance for WhiteWave’s sale to Danone, while James Fishkin got industrial equipment distributor Ritchie Bros’ acquisition of IronPlanet through without any remedies. Fishkin also advised Dollar Tree on selling 330 stores as required by the FTC for its tie-up with Family Dollar, though like the firm’s 2015 Albertsons/Safeway merger, this remedy didn’t work out well for the divestiture buyer. In other scrutinised tie-ups – such as Alaska Airlines/Virgin, Energy Solutions/Waste Control Specialists, AMC/Carmike, Walgreens/Rite Aid and Teva/Actavis – the firm represents confidential third parties that are competitors or customers.

Even critics of Gibson Dunn & Crutcher talk about its “obviously excellent cartel practice”, which is “second to none; the team is phenomenal from the top to the bottom”. Former Antitrust Division deputy for criminal enforcement Scott Hammond chairs the antitrust group, and leads the criminal defence of companies in at least half a dozen product investigations. The firm acts for UBS in probes of foreign exchange, Libor, precious metals and other products. Hammond and D Jarrett Arp represent Heritage in the DOJ’s generic pharmaceuticals case, in which some executives have pleaded guilty. Arp notes that the firm is distinguished by its credibility in handling an investigation from the first whisper of concern to appealing against class certification in private lawsuits.

This ability to integrate a team in all phases of a matter goes beyond follow-on damages. In defending transport platform Uber against claims of a price-fixing conspiracy among its independent contractors, Cynthia Richman in DC and colleagues in other offices pushed to have the case arbitrated. The issue is now on appeal, which drew partner Theodore Boutrous, Jr into the litigation; he and Richman also work together on Apple suppliers’ monopolisation counterclaim against chipmaker Qualcomm’s patent royalties lawsuit. Richman represented Swisher at the Ninth Circuit in successfully vacating a US$44 million antitrust jury verdict against it in an antitrust lawsuit brought by Trendsettah. On appeal, Thomas Hungar – now general counsel for the US House of Representatives – and Joshua Soven in August 2016 won Seventh Circuit dismissal of Robinson-Patman Act claims against Clorox for refusing to sell large-package sizes of Clorox products to a small retailer. Joseph Kattan is working on Sabre’s appeal after a trial loss to US Airways, and helped Sony Music block class certification in the Digital Music antitrust litigation.

Though less well known than the other two legs of the antitrust practice, Gibson Dunn’s deal work is impressive, and often takes place on a stand-alone basis with other firms handling corporate aspects. Such recent hired gun work includes the US$48 billion AT&T/DirecTV merger, US$12.7 billion Schlumberger/Cameron tie-up, US$8 billion Southern Co/AGL Resources merger – and Adam Di Vincenzo advising Walmart on the US$310 million purchase of Bonobos. Soven handled the US clearance for long-time client Marriott’s US$13.8 billion acquisition of rival hotel brand Starwood.

The “very, very good” Janet McDavid had long led the antitrust team at HOGAN LOVELLS, which also draws competitors’ compliments for younger partners such as the “outstanding” Logan Breed, and Leigh Oliver, the 2017 winner of GCR’s Lawyer Under 40 award. While former FTC commissioner Julie Brill left in May 2017 to go in-house at Microsoft, Christopher Casey joined in December 2016 from the DOJ, and Andrew Lee came on board in February 2017 from Steptoe & Johnson. The group further bolstered its partner ranks in January 2017 by promoting Justin Bernick and Meghan Rissmiller. Most notably, it set up a successor to McDavid as practice head with the addition of former FTC chairwoman Edith Ramirez in September 2017.

McDavid and Breed served as US antitrust counsel to SABMiller in its more than US$100 billion acquisition by AB InBev, which the DOJ cleared with structural and behavioural remedies in July 2016. Logan Breed handled a second request investigation and Department of Transportation application for antitrust immunity for Aeromexico’s proposed alliance agreement with Delta, and Joseph Krauss led the global team advising Dell in selling its information technology services business to NTT data for US$3 billion in March 2016. J Robert Roberson, Benjamin Holt, Bernick and Rismiller defend Daimler Trucks in the Class 8 Transmission antitrust litigation brought by direct and indirect purchasers, after competing transmission makers won a jury verdict against Eaton for anticompetitive exclusive deals with its customers.

Healthcare is still the most frequent business for Hogan Lovells’ Washington, DC antitrust practice. Krauss and Rismiller steered Change Healthcare through a DOJ second request over its proposed US$3.4 billion joint venture with McKesson, leading to unconditional clearance. Acting for Advocate Health Care in its proposed merger with NorthShore University Health System, Robertson and Oliver won at trial in Chicago federal court, but lost at the Seventh Circuit in November 2016. Lawsuits against Blue Cross Blue Shield by both providers and beneficiaries alleging a market allocation scheme remains the blockbuster multidistrict litigation, for which Robertson and Bernick are co-lead defence counsel. More quietly, Holt and Bernick are defending Mylan against accusations by state attorneys general that it fixed prices with other generic drugmakers.

Lawyers from other firms hail Jones Day as “terrific,” calling it a “go-to shop” for merger litigation that is “very strong” in DC. The practice is notable for its sheer quantity of both partners and matters. It is inclined to hire laterally – practice chair David Wales says he’s looking for good cartel lawyers – and its hourly rates can make it more accessible for cases such as FTC challenges to hospital tie-ups that involve lots of hard legal work but not necessarily large sums of money. Practice-builder Joe Sims retired in 2016, but the firm’s ties to the Trump administration could weigh in its favour. It promoted deal lawyer Michael Gleason to partner in January 2017.

Gleason was part of a Phillip Proger-led team, also featuring star litigator John Majoras, that tried to get Aetna’s proposed US$37 billion purchase of rival health insurer Humana through the DOJ and, when that failed, through the Washington, DC federal court. That particular merger trial – the fifth for Jones Day in less than two years – was a win for the Antitrust Division, as was Electrolux/General Electric by default when the companies gave up on the deal. Deere hired Majoras to fight for an acquisition of Monsanto’s Precision Planting business, but the seller backed out of the deal in May 2017, shortly before trial. The firm has fared better against the FTC, with a legislative success – obtaining state action immunity – that forced the commission to drop its lawsuit against the merger of West Virginia hospitals Cabell Huntington and St Mary’s Medical Center. But the FTC lawyers beat Jones Day on appeal in another hospital deal, PinnacleHealth/Penn State Hershey. In what might be deemed a draw, client Rite-Aid backed away from a total sale of itself for US$17.2 billion to Walgreens Boots, but was able to sell fewer than half of its stores instead.

Of course, Jones Day lawyers are not always litigating mergers. Sometimes they negotiate consent decrees, as Wales and Bruce McDonald did for HeidelbergCement’s acquisition of Italcementi; sometimes they get deals through a second request without any divestiture, as Michael Knight did for Cintas’s tie-up with G&K. The firm has also built a reputation for defending brand-name drug­makers such as Kyorin and Sanofi against patent-related antitrust claims.

Latham & Watkins has added more counsel recently with Alan Devlin’s return from the FTC in July 2017. However, the only change in partnership was the departure of Abbott “Tad” Lipsky in February 2017 to serve for a few months as the acting director of the FTC’s bureau of competition before taking up a position at the Global Antitrust Institute think tank.

Peers describe the practice as “very strong” on cartel defence, regulation and litigation, with Margaret Zwisler perennially deemed “a great litigator”. She led the defence of Cox Communications against cable subscribers’ claims of anticompetitive bundling, in which a judge rejected an Oklahoma jury’s verdict to enter judgment as a matter of law for Cox in January 2016. Four months later, Zwisler beat cranberry farmers’ bid for class certification in their monopolisation claims against Ocean Spray. She continues to represent Barclays in the interest rate swaps litigation, and helped the London Metal Exchange escape the aluminium warehousing case. As the global auto parts cartel investigation begins to wind down, Latham & Watkins blocked follow-on indirect purchaser plaintiffs’ attempts to amend their complaints for maximum joint and several liability, and negotiated relatively favourable settlements of all remaining class action cases against DOJ amnesty applicant Sumitomo Electric. For a confidential client, Lipsky and Jason Cruise resolved a four-year FTC conduct probe into trade association activities.

The firm also keeps busy with a sheaf of mergers, such as representing Agrium in its US$36 billion merger of equals with Potash; advising Entercom in its acquisition of CBS Radio; and counselling Siemens in its US$4.5 billion acquisition of Mentor Graphics. In April 2016, Amanda Reeves and Michael Egge helped to obtain DOJ clearance for Time Warner Cable’s US$78 billion merger with Charter Communications, conditioned on the new cable giant’s not impeding online video distributors’ access to content. Reeves acted for Gavis Pharmaceuticals, the acquisition of which by Lupin met with a second request from the FTC but ultimately cleared with divestitures in February 2016. Egge and Cruise advised FMC Technologies on its US$4.5 billion merger with Technip, and Egge teamed with San Francisco colleagues for Avago’s US$37 billion acquisition of Broadcom.

Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom has “a good strong presence in DC on mergers and litigation,” a top antitrust lawyer from a rival firm says, particularly with the August 2016 homecoming of Tara Reinhart from serving as the FTC’s chief trial counsel. After two years at one federal antitrust agency, she promptly turned around to litigate against the other, going to trial in spring 2017 alongside practice chair Steven Sunshine to defend Energy Solutions’ proposed US$367 million acquisition of Waste Control Specialists. The DOJ ultimately won when the judge avoided grappling with the failing firm defence by saying Waste Control hadn’t tried hard enough to find another bidder.

Sunshine seems nearly omnipresent on matters, representing Allergan subsidiary Watson against the FTC’s pay-for-delay accusations regarding Lidoderm; Bausch + Lomb against contact lens purchasers’ claims of minimum-pricing collusion by lens makers; Bausch + Lomb owner Valeant, in selling Paragon Vision Services to settle FTC charges that its acquisition of the company violated antitrust laws; NXP Semiconductors in its acquisition by Qualcomm; and Intel’s US$15.3 billion purchase of Mobileye. Perhaps the most notable, however, was actually a settlement. Nokia hired Sunshine over the 2016 Christmas holiday to defend the company’s patent pricing policy against Apple’s antitrust challenge; by May 2017, the spat settled for at least US$2 billion.

John Nannes picks up on the investigations side, including the DOJ’s probe of the generic pharmaceutical industry – where Skadden has multiple long-standing clients – and investigations in media and transport. He continues to defend Norfolk Southern Railway in the seemingly endless Rail Freight Fuel Surcharge litigation, which currently awaits a new decision on class certification. Along with John Lyons, Nannes saw a much faster end to the Aluminium Warehousing case against Access World, other warehouse operators and various banks, when Judge Katherine Forrest shut the plaintiffs’ claims down in October 2016.

Weil Gotshal & Manges puts “some go-to people” on the big deals that get challenged, its rivals say. Chair Steven Newborn is a “formidable” lawyer, while Ann Malester is recognised as “the best on pharmaceutical merger issues” and an “outstanding advocate for clients”. But their rivals also recognise the line of succession, saying Jeffrey Perry will be able to step into Newborn’s shoes. All three, along with Steven Bernstein, have experience leading FTC merger shops, and Newborn estimates that at least 80% of deals come directly to the antitrust practice, despite Weil’s highly respected M&A group. The firm promoted Brianne Kucerik to partner in 2016.

This is undeniably a destination practice for deals. It has handled more than a dozen second requests in the past couple of years, including on mergers where other firms with notable antitrust teams were handling the corporate aspects, such as in Walgreens’ attempted tie-up with Rite Aid. After a 20-month FTC review, that deal has now been trimmed to the purchase of fewer than half of the target’s stores – which avoided an agency challenge. Discretion sometimes is the better part of valour, as Weil client Staples found after Diane Sullivan’s bravura trial effort to block the FTC from an injunction against the office supply retailer’s purchase of rival Office Depot failed. That is outweighed, however, by a host of successful, heavily scrutinised recent mergers. These include Allergan’s US$39 billion sale of its generic pharmaceuticals business to Teva; Sanofi’s US$20 billion exchange of its animal health business with Boehringer Ingelheim’s consumer healthcare business; AbbVie’s US$5.8 billion acquisition of Stemcentrx without a second request; WEX’s US$1.4 billion acquisition of Electronic Funds Source, cleared unconditionally after a second request; Sherwin-Williams’ US$11.3 billion acquisition of Valspar, cleared with remedies in May 2017; and G&K Services’ US$2.2 billion merger with Cintas.

Weil handles cartels from New York, but the DC team pitches in on some non-merger litigation. One recent win was a summary judgment for Simon & Schuster against independent ebook retailer claims following on from the Apple price-fixing case, which the Second Circuit upheld on appeal.

“If you want fighters, White & Case is the firm to go to. They think outside the box,” says a former enforcer at a top DC antitrust practice. In criminal defence, the firm looks to avoid having clients plead guilty, and in litigation, it will try everything before admitting defeat. This trait of practice chair J Mark Gidley – called “really smart” and a “darn good lawyer” by other litigators – was particularly prominent in pursuing Anthem’s acquisition of rival health insurer Cigna. When George Paul and Rebecca Farrington couldn’t get the deal through the Antitrust Division, Anthem went to trial; when the district court ruled against the tie-up, Anthem appealed; when it lost the appeal on a 2:1 decision, it took the dissenting opinion as a basis to seek Supreme Court review.

The firm promoted former DOJ attorney JD Donaldson to partner and Charles Moore to counsel in 2016. In addition to Anthem/Cigna, Donaldson assisted Paul and Farrington on Zimmer Biomet’s US$1 billion acquisition of LDR Holding. Other recent deals include Farrington on Haier’s acquisition of GE’s appliance division, and the sale of Carl Icahn’s XO Communications to Verizon.

Christopher Curran, who led for Anthem in court, gives the DOJ no quarter on the criminal side either. Instead of pleading guilty as its alleged co-conspirators in price-fixing automotive steel tubes have done, Maruyasu is fighting the prosecution. In March 2017, the Sixth Circuit refused to dismiss the indictment against the Japanese company for lack of personal jurisdiction, so it is set for trial in January 2018. Curran also acts for Toshiba in the lithium-ion battery cell follow-on actions, which were denied class certification in April 2017. The firm’s litigation specialty is in pharmaceuticals, with Eric Grannon leading for Par/Paddock in the Androgel litigation underlying the Actavis precedent, until the FTC dismissed the defendants from the case in February 2017. Peter Carney represents Allergan in a challenge to the FTC’s power to pursue equitable relief in the Lidoderm pay-for-delay case; Carney, Eileen Cole and Gidley won for Warner Chilcott in the Third Circuit against product-hopping claims about Doryx; and the firm defends Warner Chilcott in Massachusetts federal court against product-hopping and pay-for-delay allegations.

Observers say Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati is “very busy, very strong, very successful,” and quickly growing its Washington, DC practice, which includes “very smart” Susan Creighton, “real deal” Mark Rosman and “brilliant” Joshua Wright. Rosman and cartel specialist colleagues in other offices have plenty of work for clients before the DOJ, including in the generic pharmaceuticals, auto parts, capacitors and foreign exchange investigations.

The firm’s merger work particularly illustrates how it has retained its base in the technology industry while expanding into retail and other sectors. Scott Sher represented Brocade Communication Systems in its US$5.9 billion acquisition by Broadcom, which the FTC approved with divestitures. Along with Jamillia Ferris, he also acted for online event manager Cvent in its US$1.65 billion sale to Vista Equity Partners, which the DOJ ultimately cleared unconditionally despite a second request spurred by complainants and concerns about network effects. Ferris, Sher and Wright counselled FanDuel in its proposed merger with rival fantasy sports gambling site DraftKings, which the companies dropped after the FTC sued in June 2017. Following another second request, the FTC cleared Wilson Sonsini client iControl’s acquisition by Alarm.com without remedies and the US$140 million deal closed in March 2017 after an unusual eleventh-hour antitrust lawsuit by Honeywell settled. The firm has also represented third parties such as McDonald’s in opposing the Staples/Office Depot merger, and ACT as a competitor during Abbott’s US$25 billion acquisition of St Jude.

Wilson Sonsini also represents Walgreens as a witness in the FTC’s conduct case against 1-800 Contacts, but has a more direct involvement – with Sher representing the defendant VisionDirect – in follow-on civil litigation regarding the alleged suppression of competition for online advertising of contact lenses. He and Creighton act for Arista Networks in its lawsuit against Cisco systems. In other plaintiff-side work, Seth Silber is part of the team that helped Amphastar get its antitrust claims against pharma competitors Momenta and Sandoz revived by the First Circuit, and that represents Mylan in suing Celgene over its alleged abuse of safety restrictions on Thalomid and Revlimid to block generic competition. Silber defends Mylan against claims following on from the DOJ generic drug probe.

The Washington, DC office at Axinn, Veltrop & Harkrider insists that it is no longer the little sibling of the New York office. Practice co-chair John DeQ Briggs heads up a strong antitrust practice in the nation’s capital – one that has its hand in major deals, litigation efforts and criminal investigations. The firm proudly says it does not handle many “run-of-the-mill” cases, noting that lawyers will not do a lot of HSR filings for easy deals. Axinn was lead and global coordinating counsel for Dell in its US$67 billion acquisition of EMC, which required approvals in about 20 jurisdictions. Dell called for partner Michael Keeley personally to travel to China to help push the deal through regulators there. Keeley and Russell Steinthal took the lead for Stanley Black & Decker in its acquisition of the Craftsman tool brand.

Turning to litigation, the firm is active in the Blue Cross Blue Shield antitrust litigation, where plaintiffs are attempting to break up the health insurance group. Axinn represents Independence Blue Cross against plaintiff powerhouses Boies Schiller Flexner and Hausfeld. Tyson Foods also retained the DC team in 2017 to help it fend off claims it conspired to drive down chicken grower pay. Stanley Black & Decker also employs Axinn’s services for litigation efforts, specifically in defending against an inventor’s claim of a group boycott of his safety feature for power saws. The Axinn DC team remains involved in global investigations through its representation of confidential Japanese companies and others.

Some of the best litigators in town praise Boies Schiller Flexner, which plays both sides of the “v” to an extent unusual in Washington, DC. Partner Richard Feinstein estimates that nearly half of the FTC bureau of competition’s resources go to healthcare matters, and the firm makes good use of his experience as bureau director, in matters such as defending Sanford Health’s acquisition of Mid Dakota Clinic. He and fellow FTC alumnus Nicholas Widnell act for Carolinas Healthcare System against the DOJ’s claim of anticompetitive anti-steering provisions – an Antitrust Division argument that this firm has beaten before, on behalf of American Express. William Isaacson is defending Travis Kalanick against a putative class action accusing the Uber founder of a price-fixing conspiracy with drivers that his company insists are independent contractors, not employees. James Denvir and Michael Mitchell got a judge to throw out travel agents’ allegation that Delta Airlines and other carriers conspired with an airline fare publishing company to block cheaper multi-city itineraries, but Denvir continues to fight passengers’ claims that Delta conspired with American, United and Southwest to cap seat capacity.

Isaacson says the firm is willing to commit resources to contingency cases. On the plaintiff’s side, he, Karen Dunn, Amy Mauser and Christopher Renner represent Apple in a US$1 billion monopolisation and contract claim against Qualcomm as the two tech giants battle over the chipmaker’s patent licensing practices. A Delaware federal judge shaved some claims off International Construction Products’ lawsuit against heavy construction equipment makers including Caterpillar, but Denvir and Renner are still pressing an allegation of a group boycott. In June 2017, the Ninth Circuit refused to hear an Arizona public utility’s appeal of a lower court’s denial of dismissal in SolarCity’s monopoly lawsuit, brought by Feinstein, Mauser, Dunn and Isaacson. In mergers, the firm represents some third parties with concerns, such as Salesforce in objecting to the Microsoft/LinkedIn deal. Boies Schiller added to its antitrust partners with the promotion of Abby Dennis in January 2016.

Crowell & Moring has “a number of good people”, the co-chair of a top DC practice says, while another rival admires the firm’s client list. It has expanded and diversified while retaining long-standing customers such as AT&T, which partners Wm Randolph Smith, Jeane Thomas and Shawn Johnson are guiding in the US$85 billion acquisition of media company Time Warner. Kent Gardiner, Shari Ross Lahlou, David Schnorrenberg and Joseph Miller acted for Humana in its proposed US$37 billion sale to rival health insurer Aetna, but the companies opted to drop their deal after a Washington, DC federal court enjoined it. Confidential clients have the firm representing them as third parties in tie-ups such as Smiths/Morpho Detection, and the firm publicly acted for Clean Harbors in the DOJ’s challenge to the attempted EnergySolutions/Waste Control Specialists deal. Gardiner, Schnorrenberg and Astor Heaven defended United Airlines’ acquisition of slots at Newark Airport from a DOJ lawsuit to block the deal, which became unnecessary when a regulatory change removed slot constraints at the airport.

United Airlines also uses Crowell for non-merger litigation, such as passengers’ claim – following a DOJ investigation – that the airline colluded with its competitors to limit seat capacity. This, the Rail Freight Fuel Surcharge litigation against CSX Transportation, and the Blue Cross Blue Shield lawsuit brought by physicians and subscribers remain ongoing, but the firm won two motions for summary judgment in 2016. Upheld by the Tenth Circuit in March 2017, a court threw out Suture Express’s tying and exclusive dealing claims against Owens & Minor, represented by Lahlou and John Gibson. A Third Circuit appeal remains pending in Lahlou’s victory for DuPont over a claim of fixing the price of titanium dioxide. In a further boost to the firm’s capabilities, former Antitrust Division deputy for civil enforcement Juan Arteaga joined as a partner in July 2017.

Rivals praise Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer’s DC lawyers, from partner Paul Yde with 32 years of antitrust experience, to associate Jan Rybnicek. The firm promoted FTC alumna Mary Lehner from counsel to partner in May 2016 and Hiram Andrews from associate to counsel in January 2017. Bob Schlossberg retired from the Freshfields partnership in May 2016 but remains active in his of counsel role.

AB InBev’s acquisition of SABMiller naturally dominated the firm’s time in 2016. Rich Snyder was point man for local counsel in the Americas on the merger. Other major deal work includes Yde, Lehner and Thomas Ensign acting for Rexam on its takeover by rival beverage container maker Ball, which prompted a second request and divestiture condition by the FTC in June 2016; Lehner for Smiths Group’s acquisition of Morpho Detection, for which the DOJ in March 2017 required a divestiture before granting early termination; and Yde for United Airlines on its proposed acquisition of Delta’s slots at Newark airport, which the DOJ challenged until a regulatory change in April 2017 ended the scarcity of slots. Freshfields is now regular US antitrust counsel to Johnson & Johnson, which includes handling the merger control aspects of its US$30 billion acquisition of Actelion. On the investigation side, the firm represented United Airlines in the DOJ investigation of potential collusion in seat capacity, and confidential clients in the ongoing auto parts probes. Litigation includes Bruce McCulloch defending amnesty recipient British Vita Group in the Polyurethane Foam follow-on class action, and Snyder representing Hachette in the private lawsuits that followed the DOJ’s ebooks case.

Bruce Hoffman was still at the helm at Hunton & Williams for the period reported on for this survey, but in June 2017 he, David Higbee, Djordje Petkoski, Ryan Shores and Todd Stenerson left for Shearman & Sterling. As of July 2017, Hoffman is slated to join the FTC. Hunton has been very active in litigation, with some investigation and merger work to complement its robust practice. Hoffman, partner Amanda Wait – who now leads the practice – and October 2015 addition Phyllis Marcus provide solid FTC experience while partner David Higbee provided the DOJ perspective. The firm punches above its weight as an antitrust boutique, one long-time observer says.

Hunton & Williams counselled Cash America in its merger of equals with First Cast, the country’s largest pawn shop; the tie-up created a combined company with a US$2.4 billion market capitalisation. Hoffman had been advising Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan in the national antitrust litigation against BCBS plans across the country, as well as in a suit brought by rival Aetna. Petkoski defended Rubycon in damages litigation following the DOJ’s capacitors cartel prosecution. The firm also counselled Capital One in a lawsuit that challenged the transition from swipe payment cards to chips, and thus liability for fraud, which Capital One and the other defendants won on a motion to dismiss in late 2016.

New partner Matthew Reilly – a former FTC staffer with a deep background on high-profile mergers while at the government and private practice – made waves when he headed to Kirkland & Ellis in late 2016 to join its already strong DC practice. Reilly joins Mark Kovner and 17 other partners and the firm boasts an impressive list of clients that call on Kirkland when they engage in bet-the-company deals. Those included advising Teva in the largest-ever pharma­ceutical divestiture during its massive deal with Allergan; advising Charter Communications in its US$78 billion acquisition of Time Warner Cable and US$10.4 billion purchase of Bright House Networks, which the DOJ looked at closely; and counselling Nexstar Broadcasting Group in its US$4.6 billion purchase of Media General. In total, Kirkland filed 311 HSR notifications in the 2017 fiscal year.

The Kirkland DC team represented multiple clients in several reverse payment settlement cases, including in the Nexium antitrust litigation. The team counselled Ranbaxy and Teva Pharmaceuticals in multidistrict class action litigation alleging a patent settlement among Teva, Ranbaxy and two others violated the antitrust laws – the first reverse payment case to go to trial after FTC v Actavis. Kirkland represents ABB Optical in the Disposable Contact Lens antitrust litigation, which accuses lens distributors of conspiring to maintain minimum resale pricing in violation of state and federal antitrust laws.

Mayer Brown’s DC lawyers are handling a variety of antitrust cases across the country. Partners Mark Ryan, Bill Stallings, Richard Favretto and Robert Bloch provide deep government experience and have helped propel the firm into major global cases. Ryan and Stallings assisted Virgin America in its US$2.6 billion acquisition by Alaska Air, which the DOJ eventually let pass with small divestitures. The team also represented an interested third party in the now-defunct Deere/Precision Planting merger; and acted for Nestlé Purina PetCare in its acquisition of Merrick Pet Care in 2015.

The team represents the Big 10 conference in tandem with the Chicago office in ongoing litigation regarding the NCAA in California. Ryan acts for Viamedia, the largest independent spot cable advertising representative in the US, in a lawsuit against cable giant Comcast for allegedly monopolising the spot cable advertising market through subsidiary Comcast Spotlight, which competes directly with Viamedia. A federal judge largely denied Comcast’s motion to dismiss in November 2016. Partners Adam Hudes and Carmine Zarlenga had two victories for Nestlé in late 2015. A US appellate court upheld the dismissal of direct purchasers’ antitrust class action against chocolate candy makers, finding that evidence of a conspiracy in Canada was too ambiguous to support an inference of price fixing in the US; and a district court dismissed antitrust claims brought against Nestlé by rival spring water bottler Nirvana. Ryan acts for CDK Global in defending against Authenticom’s efforts to gain access to the data in CDK’s auto dealer management systems.

The Washington antitrust team at McDermott Will & Emery got a boost in January 2017 when one of the DOJ’s two antitrust criminal enforcement section heads, Mary Strimel, made her way to the firm. The firm lost partner Warren Rosborough to Emerson Thomson Bennett and Bilal Sayyed to Cadwalader Wickersham & Taft. Ray Jacobsen continues to head up the substantial DC office, which handles a variety of deals and litigation for clients across the country. Jacobsen, along with Joel Grosberg, Carla Hine and William Díaz, advised Evonik Industries in obtaining US clearance for its US$3.8 billion acquisition of the specialty and coating additives business of Air Products. Jacobsen and Díaz also teamed up for Impax in the drugmaker’s US$586 million acquisition of 19 products that were divested as part of the FTC’s consent order in the Teva/Allergan deal. McDermott is also trying to steer candymaker and pet-care company Mars through its US$9.1 billion acquisition of pet health service company VCA.

Also active on the non-merger front, McDermott’s DC team won summary judgment for Mars in the chocolate price-fixing litigation. Peg Warner defends Weyerhaeuser in the containerboard class action; and Impax tapped Jacobsen and Paul Thompson in March 2016 to defend the company against allegations it conspired to raise the price of digoxin or certain doxycycline products.

The Morgan Lewis & Bockius team describes itself as the “hottest practice group in DC right now,” and it may be right. The DC antitrust team is litigating against the FTC in two simultaneous cases – defending Qualcomm against the highly publicised monopoly claim; and defending Shire against allegations it abused the citizen petitioning process. The former of the two has seen considerable follow-on action, including dozens of class actions and a lawsuit by Apple. That surely makes up for the firm’s biggest dollar value deal – Pfizer’s US$160 billion proposed inversion merger with Allergan – falling flat after the Obama administration changed the tax rules on such transactions. In total, the DC practice makes merger filings in about 20 countries each year.

Darren Tucker and Hill Wellford bring government experience to the cases on which they work, including providing strategic counselling and antitrust advice to Google on Android and other services on a global basis. This has included engaging with enforcers and coordinating counsel in the US, EU, Russia, Japan, China and elsewhere. Jon Roellke in DC acts for ICAP in the Interest Rate Swaps antitrust litigation. The firm also works for the pharmaceutical industry: Leiv Blad, who left the firm in February 2017, negotiated a favourable settlement with Alaska’s state attorney general on behalf of generic-drug maker Lupin regarding alleged pay-for-delay settlements with the branded-drug makers of Loestrin and Effexor.

Rivals are quick to heap praise on Roxann E Henry and others at Morrison & Foerster. Partner Jonathan Gowdy lead the team advising Deere & Company in its aborted acquisition of Precision Planting, which attracted a DOJ challenge. The firm also fields a decent amount of work from Japanese technology company/quasi-hedge fund SoftBank, including through satellite services provider Intelsat’s February merger with OneWeb – which MoFo also represents – with a US$1.7 billion investment from SoftBank to capitalise the merged company. The firm operates under the expertise of practice chair Stephen Smith, and colleagues Roger Fones and David L Meyer are recognised for their experience at the Antitrust Division, where Fones spent almost 30 years and Meyer served as principal deputy assistant attorney general.

Accusations of collusion and inevitable follow-on litigation absorb much of this team’s time, whether it is defending a client in multi-jurisdictional investigations of auto parts, freight forwarding, batteries or semiconductors. The DC team advises both individuals and clients in cartel probes. The team also represents UPS in California, defending the shipping company from charges that it conspired with FedEx not to deal with shipping consultants, succeeding at the district court and now awaiting a decision on whether the Ninth Circuit will reverse or affirm the lower court. Morrison & Foerster also represents Jetro in the interchange fees litigation.

O’Melveny & Myers continues to have one of the leading practices in Washington, DC, with a strong set of cases over the past couple of years and Richard G Parker universally acclaimed as a strong lawyer. Ian Simmons calls a US$5 million jury verdict for American Airlines over global distribution system Sabre – trebled to US$15 million – a “seminal result” against elite law firms including Cleary Gottlieb and Cravath Swaine & Moore. The firm also handled work in other high-profile cases, including Parker leading the litigation effort against the Antitrust Division for Halliburton’s proposed acquisition of Baker Hughes, which was ultimately abandoned before trial; and, along with partners Ted Hassi and Katrina Robson, representing Humana in its now-abandoned health insurance merger with Aetna. Despite being on the losing side of that litigation, the firm continues to fight hard against the government.

O’Melveny’s string of successes includes negotiating the consent decree that helped Alaska Airlines close its acquisition of Virgin America, a deal that the lawyers for the merging companies stressed would lead to a stronger competitor to the “big four” of Delta, American, Southwest and United. And lawyers at O’Melveny filed a rare competitor lawsuit for Honeywell in New Jersey earlier in 2017 to try to stop Alarm.com’s acquisition of assets from iControl, which led to a confidential settlement. The DC team represents technology giant Samsung and laboratory services company Quest Diagnostics before enforcers around the world. While the New York office negotiated a large cut in the fine on Bumble Bee Foods in the canned tuna cartel, Hassi defends the seafood company in follow-on litigation.

Getting a bump up the ranking after a couple of extremely active years is Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison, which received a substantial injection of four antitrust partners from Cadwalader Wickersham & Taft in August 2016. Former Antitrust Division head Charles F (Rick) Rule, Jonathan Kanter, Joseph Bial and Andrew Forman made the jump, with Rule taking over as the firm’s co-chair. The four have particular expertise in HSR work and other merger issues, complementing an already-prominent litigation team to make what Rule calls a “whole practice”. The firm had its hand in some of biggest mergers of the past year, including representing Cigna in its saga to be acquired by Anthem despite the client’s reluctance. Paul Weiss also advised Microsoft on its US$26 billion acquisition of LinkedIn; Time Warner in its acquisition of Charter; and Monsanto in its pending sale to Bayer.

Kenneth A Gallo represented News Corp against now-settled monopolisation claims and Mastercard in interchange fee litigation. The team won a huge victory before the US Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit when it convinced it to throw out a US$340 million verdict against client Becton Dickinson. Kanter is active in counselling third parties that have issues with other companies, including those that have concerns about Google and its practices. The firm also remains active in the capacitors litigation, and in the government and private litigation related to the financial institutions. Another big client is performing rights organisation ASCAP, which has found itself front and centre regarding consent decrees and more in the past year.

Sidley Austin’s recent lateral hires demonstrate the firm’s dedication to its DC antitrust practice. In March 2016, FTC general counsel Jonathan Nuechterlein joined as a partner; in the spring of 2017, former FTC chairman Timothy Muris left Kirkland & Ellis to become senior counsel at Sidley; and James Lowe moved from WilmerHale’s to Sidley’s partnership. Ken Glazer, who joined from the FTC with chair William Blumenthal in 2013, has retired from antitrust practice.

As it did in AT&T’s 2015 deal for DirecTV, the firm provides regulatory counsel in AT&T’s US$85 billion acquisition of Time Warner. Blumenthal and Karen Kazmerzak represent CBOE Holdings in its US$3.2 billion acquisition of Bats Global Markets, which cleared the FTC in November 2016 without a second request. Cabela’s US$5.5 billion sale to Bass Pro Shops, in which Blumenthal acted for the seller, underwent a lengthy second request but ultimately won unconditional clearance from the FTC in July 2017. In dealings with the DOJ, Kazmerzak brought Recall’s tie-up with fellow records management company Iron Mountain through merger review with remedies. However, she and Blumenthal lost at a preliminary injunction hearing in March 2016 when the Antitrust Division sought to block Tribune Publishing from buying Freedom Communications. Sidley is involved in several different auto parts investigations and follow-on damages actions, as well as the DOJ’s generic pharmaceuticals cartel probe.

Simpson Thacher & Bartlett retains what one competitor calls “a great platform” from its corporate practice, and is “always going to be an important player” in antitrust, even with the autumn 2016 departure of practice chair Matthew Reilly to Kirkland & Ellis. Managing partner Peter Thomas now heads the DC practice, which elevated Abram Ellis to partner in November 2016. Before departing, Reilly – along with Peter Herrick and Andrew Lacy – represented Office Depot in its US$6.3 billion sale to rival office superstore chain Staples, which the FTC successfully blocked.

Better fortune went to Sara Razi as lead counsel for Ahold in its merger with Delhaize, which closed in July 2016, after a year-long FTC investigation and the divestiture of 81 locations. Simpson Thacher acted for NXP Semiconductors in its merger with Freescale Semiconductor, which the FTC also cleared with structural remedies. Outside the merger realm, Ellis supports his New York colleagues in multiple antitrust lawsuits in the financial sector, including representation of JPMorgan Chase in Libor, Tradeweb in interest rate swaps and Deutsche Bank in Treasuries. Notably, he has helped the International Swaps and Derivatives Association avoid being named as a defendant in the ISDAfix lawsuit.

Peers say Sullivan & Cromwell’s antitrust practice head Daryl Libow is a good lawyer, and he is quick to point out that it has been a good year for the firm. The headline-grabbing news is the arrival of former DOJ antitrust chief Renata Hesse, which certainly strengthens and deepens the firm’s antitrust practice. Within a few months of her return to private practice, Hesse had taken the lead for Amazon in the online retailer’s acquisition of organic grocery chain Whole Foods and obtained FTC clearance with a pull-and-refile but no second request.

The firm also promoted special counsel Joseph Matelis – who has Antitrust Division experience – to partner. He acts for DS Smith in the corrugated packaging company’s US$920 million acquisition of competitor Interstate Resources, and helped to shepherd Enbridge’s US$28 billion purchase of Spectra Energy through the FTC with divestitures. With Christopher Viapiano, Libow represents Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi in Libor investigations, as well as follow-on litigation. He and Amanda Davidoff are involved in several futures-related actions, including securing a dismissal for JPMorgan in a silver futures case – which is back in district court after reversal – and representing BP in the Brent Crude Oil multidistrict litigation.

Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr is viewed by its peers as a “very good” firm, with the “terrific” Hartmut Schneider on mergers and Thomas Mueller “prominent” on cartels. Partner James Lowe moved to Sidley Austin in 2017. In 2016, he had worked with Schneider to steer International Paper’s US$2.2 billion acquisition of Weyerhaeuser’s cellulose fibres business, which the DOJ cleared without a second request. The Antitrust Division was less open to Baker Hughes’ proposed US$34.6 billion sale to Halliburton, suing to block this tie-up of the the world’s second- and third-largest oilfield service companies. The companies abandoned the deal in May 2016, but Baker Hughes got out with a US$3.5 billion break-up fee. Schneider had better luck for Baker Hughes in June 2017, as the DOJ conditionally cleared its US$32 billion joint venture with General Electric.

Outside the merger realm, Steve Cherry, David Donovan, Patrick Carome and David Molot continue to represent DENSO in the damages claims following on from its guilty plea in the auto parts cartel, leading a joint defence against plaintiffs’ efforts to consolidate and create joint and several liability for different products. Cartel and follow-on action work led by Mueller includes defending ELNA in the capacitor cartel probe, eventually negotiating a 60% fine discount based on cooperation and inability to pay; individuals Rohan Ramchandani in the foreign exchange and Jeffrey Glazer in the generic pharmaceuticals probes; and Schaeffler Group USA in the bearings damages claims. Leon Greenfield acted for Apple in accusing Nokia-connected patent assertion entities of violating sections 1 and 2 of the Sherman Act, while working with Cherry and Ronald Machen to defend Panasonic against CoKinetic’s claims of anticompetitive exclusionary conduct.

Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld has added two well-regarded young partners in the past two years: Corey Roush from Hogan Lovells in September 2015 and Gorav Jindal from Dechert in August 2016. Roush, along with Pratik Shah and James Tysse, represent Daimler Trucks North America in the putative class actions filed against it and other heavy truck manufacturers for allegedly conspiring to have Eaton monopolise the market for heavy-duty truck transmissions, in which only the individual plaintiffs’ claims still survive after a Third Circuit ruling in February 2017. The same appellate court also smiled upon Paul Hewitt’s and Fairley Spillman’s client Mylan in the Provigil pay-for-delay litigation in September 2016 by decertifying the direct purchaser class. On the mergers side, Roush acts for 7-Eleven in its US$3.3 billion deal with Sunoco, which was issued a second request in July 2017. He and Hewitt teamed up to advise animal healthcare services company VCA on its US$9.1 billion sale to Mars, announced in January 2017, which is also in the FTC second request process.

Before leaving for Simpson Thacher & Bartlett in August, former Antitrust Division prosecutor John Terzaken had the ALLEN & OVERY team working like a well-oiled machine as the firm’s DC office tackles significant litigation work, especially its follow-on actions. The team represents BNP Paribas against allegations of collusion in the credit default swaps market; Bosch in 31 different damages claims by auto dealers, end payors, and direct and indirect purchasers; Deutsche Bank in a financial benchmarking case; and Tri-Union in the on­going litigation regarding allegations of price-fixing in the packaged seafood industry. FTC alumnus John Roberti is now the senior antitrust partner.

BakerHostetler, whose antitrust practice’s core remains the 15 people who came from Howrey, continues to take challenging cases to trial. Robert Abrams leads the DC office and works with partners Terry Sullivan, Bob Brookhiser, Greg Commins and Dan Foix in leading a farmers’ class action alleging that milk marketers and processors conspired to stifle competition. The case, due to settlement objectors and opt-outs, remains ongoing despite the settlement being the largest judgment in Vermont history. Abrams, Brookhiser, Commins and Foix represent long-time client Caterpillar against group boycott and exclusionary dealing allegations brought by International Construction Products, facing off against Boies Schiller Flexner. Foix and others are also trying to break ground in a suit against a labour union – a type of entity that has largely stayed outside the antitrust laws – in New York. Partners John Fornaciari and Bob Disch act for shipping company Nippon Yusen Kaisha in follow-on damages claims regarding its role in the roll-on roll-off cartel; the district court threw out the claims as being barred by the Shipping Act, and a decision from the Third Circuit is pending.

Baker McKenzie’s loss of Lee Van Voorhis to Jenner & Block in September 2016 was offset by the arrival of new antitrust practice chair Mark Hamer, who joined the firm’s DC office from DLA Piper. Before going into private practice, Hamer had been a senior trial attorney in the DOJ’s antitrust division for six years. The DC office also added Craig Lee in November 2016 – he was the assistant chief of the division’s Washington Criminal I section, balancing Hamer’s civil litigation experience with a criminal prosecutor’s CV. A prominent global firm, Baker McKenzie is turning its attention back to growth in the North American offices. The firm handled US filings for FedEx/TNT and counselled industrial and environmental filtration company CLARCOR in its US$4.3 billion acquisition by Parker Hannifin. The firm also represented Okaya Electric in a DOJ grand jury investigation, which was closed as to Okaya in January 2016, and in a follow-on damages claim, which was settled for US$3.7 million. It also acted for Safran in its sale of its Morpho-Detection security solutions business to the Smiths Group for US$710 million, and for Veolia Environnement in its US$350 million acquisition of a nuclear waste company and a separate US$325 million acquisition of Chemours’ the sulfur products division.

Cooley handled 60–70 merger filings in the past year, most coming in the high-technology and pharmaceutical industries – the firm’s forte. Partner Jacqueline Grise helped to guide Alarm.com through an eight-month FTC investigation of the long-time client’s acquisition of iControl without the enforcer bringing a complaint, only to find itself on the receiving end of a rare competitor lawsuit to block the merger, brought by O’Melveny & Myers on behalf of Honeywell. The DC team, which includes partners and FTC alumni M Howard Morse and Marc Schildkraut, also counselled Rovi in its US$1.1 billion acquisition of TiVo, which received 60 days of close scrutiny from the FTC; and Uber’s US$680 million acquisition of self-driving truck company Otto. Grise also acted for Medivation in its US$14 billion sale to Pfizer, Horizon on its US$1.1 billion acquisition of Hyperion Therapeutics, and Dollar Shave Club in its billion-dollar sale to Unilever. Major litigation success came when Cooley obtained summary judgment for Patheon in litigation brought by joint venture partner ProCaps; Morse and Schildkraut defended that victory at the US Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit.

The size and scope of Davis Polk & Wardwell’s DC practice continues to grow as the firm tackles major deals for its clients. Former FTC chair Jon Leibowitz heads the group, while Mike Sohn recently rejoined Howard Shelanski and the rest of the team in handling global deals. The big one currently on the plate is counselling Syngenta in its US$43 billion agricultural merger by ChemChina, which the FTC cleared in 2017 with the divestiture of three types of pesticides. Other recent deal work includes counselling Zuffa in its US$4 billion sale of Ultimate Fighting Championship; advising BATS Global Markets on its US$3.2 billion acquisition by CBOE Holdings; representing Emerson on its US$3.15 billion acquisition of the valves and controls business from Pentair; and acting for ConAgra on the sale of its private label operations to Treehouse Foods for US$2.7 billion. The most headline-grabbing deal of all the deals Davis Polk counselled, however, might have been Uber’s sale of its China business to local rival Didi Chuxing.

Former deputy director of the FTC’s bureau of competition Barry Nigro steered the antitrust ship for Fried Frank Harris Shriver & Jacobson in Washington, DC until August 2017, when he became an Antitrust Division deputy. Before his departure, he counselled Media General through its US$4.6 billion Nexstar deal, which was solved with divestitures after DOJ and Federal Communications Commission scrutiny. He also advised New Mountain Capital portfolio company SNL Financial’s US$2.2 billion sale to McGraw Hill Financial and New Mountain’s deals for Equian and Trover Solutions. Nigro also assisted ProQuest in its acquisition of Ex Libris Group from Golden Gate Capital, and Permira as part of a consortium buying eBay Enterprise from eBay for US$925 million.

After receiving praise from many in the DC bar, Hughes Hubbard & Reed is a new entrant to the survey. Despite the firm doing most of its work in New York, veteran practitioner William Kolasky has done a great job out of the DC office, which added Ali Stoeppelwerth as special counsel in October 2016. He helped to clear two mergers at the end of 2016 and start of 2017: a deal between two of the three largest Chinese apparel manufacturers, and British company E2V’s acquisition by Teledyne. When the Antitrust Division in March 2016 obtained an injunction against Freedom Communications’ sale to Tribune Publishing, Kolasky represented alternative buyer Digital First Media. He acted for the company again when it sold the Salt Lake City Tribune to its only competitor, over the objections of employees; the DOJ closed the investigation without taking action. In June 2017, the FTC cleared with divestitures the sale of his client Claris Lifesciences’ injectable drugs business to Baxter.

Ropes & Gray’s Washington, DC team is relatively young and full of energy. Practice chair Mark S Popofsky works with partners Michael McFalls, Jonathan Klarfeld and Chong Park, who joined the firm in August 2015. The team maintains a strong client list in the healthcare and pharmaceutical industry – helping AbbVie with its antitrust issues, developing a relationship with Medtronic, and working through several mergers. McFalls steered Shire in its US$32 billion acquisition of Baxalta to form a global leader in rare disease drugs, avoiding a second request from the FTC. McFalls also took the lead for daily fantasy sports company DraftKings’ ultimately abandoned acquisition of rival FanDuel. Popofsky represents Hitachi-LG Data Storage in optical disk drives follow-on damages litigation, obtaining a favourable settlement for the client in June 2016 with indirect purchasers. The team has also been active representing third-party clients in Staples/Office Depot and Rite Aid/Walgreens, and advises private equity firms through many of their transactions. Klarfeld assisted Welsh, Carson, Anderson & Stowe with all antitrust aspects, including HSR compliance and FTC investigation, in the creation of a joint venture between its company United Surgical Partners International and Tenet Healthcare.

The Steptoe & Johnson team, which includes Edward Schwartz, Ken Ewing and Doug Green, continues to do good work, despite the loss of Chong Park to Ropes & Gray. The firm represents the National Milk Producers Federation in the dairy antitrust litigation out of Illinois. The client was also happy with a settlement in that litigation in California. Schwartz acts as lead litigation counsel to Amadeus IT Group against a class action that accuses it of conspiring with competing global airfare distribution services; with the indirect purchasers’ state law damages claims dismissed, the plaintiffs now have only a claim for injunctive relief. The firm also does regular work for FedEx and Netflix, and has a hand in some criminal investigations around the world.

Venable antitrust chair Lisa Jose Fales works out of Washington, DC and the firm continues to act for several drugmakers after its big win in the Nexium pay-for-delay trial for defendant Ranbaxy – now Sun Pharmaceuticals. In the latest victory for Sun, an appellate court in September 2016 reversed the trial judge’s decision to certify a class of fewer than two dozen direct purchasers of anti-narcolepsy drug Provigil. The team says clients are bullish to go to trial using Venable, and they boast having more referrals and a stronger profile than two years ago. The firm also defends Impax Laboratories against allegations of an anticompetitive conspiracy to delay entry of a generic version of pain medication Opana ER and acne drug Solodyn. Beyond the pharmaceutical industry, Venable advises Perdue Farms in its defence against class action complaints brought by broiler chicken buyers who accuse poultry producers of conspiring to fix prices by restricting output. Venable assisted the plaintiff class in the O’Bannon antitrust suit against the National Collegiate Athletic Association over the use of college players’ likenesses without payment.

Washington, DC partner Craig Seebald continues to head the Vinson & Elkins antitrust practice, and the firm’s lawyers continue to be go-to counsel in investigations and litigation. Alden Atkins leads for Southwest Airlines in the Domestic Airline Travel antitrust litigation, which is consolidated in DC federal court. Seebald represented Maxwell in a criminal investigation concerning allegations it conspired to fix the prices of cell phone and laptop batteries. While the DOJ brought no charges against Maxwell, dozens of class action lawsuits claim the company engaged in a worldwide conspiracy to artificially stabilise the prices of such lithium-ion batteries. Both Seebald and Atkins advise Hitachi Automotive Systems in auto parts follow-on damages litigation. Partner William Lawler acted for Dart and Solo in defending claims they coordinated to keep a new material for disposable cups off the market. The US Court of Appeals for the First Circuit upheld the district court’s summary judgment for the defendants in August 2016. The firm also has some merger exposure; it made about 20 HSR filings in 2016.

Williams & Connolly continues to feature prominently in the DC bar. It openly admits that the antitrust team is not a merger shop; its lawyers instead focus on litigation and cartels. Practice heads John Schmidtlein and Jonathan Pitt have acted for an impressive list of clients in the past couple of years. 21st Century Fox routinely picks the firm for litigation defence, including in a Florida federal court where sports channel GolTV sued the company for allegedly using bribes to gain exclusive access. The team is acting for Par Pharmaceutical in the ongoing Propranolol antitrust litigation in the Southern District of New York. The firm also represented Takata in the auto parts investigation. Other clients in the past couple of years include the Dairy Farmers of America, AstraZeneca, Bank of America-Merrill Lynch Fenner Pierce & Smith, Celgene and more.

Several excellent antitrust practitioners in Washington, DC work at firms not listed in this survey. W Todd Miller and Donald I Baker stay busy at antitrust boutique Baker & Miller. Linklaters’ Jeffrey Schmidt is a former FTC competition bureau director who is active in mergers such as London Stock Exchange/Deutsche Boerse. Paul Hastings partner MJ Moltenbrey remains a force for Monsanto and airline matters; her former colleague Michael Cohen, now at Sheppard Mullin, has returned to the capital to work alongside of counsel Donald Klawiter. Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe’s hires of Alexander Okuliar from the FTC and James Tierney – a “great guy”, says the chair of a top DC antitrust practice – from the DOJ have competitors expecting to see the firm often in the future.

Firm

Head(s) of competition

Size

Who’s Who Legal nominees

Clients

Elite

Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton

Not applicable

9 partners

2 counsel

50 associates

Leah Brannon

Jeremy J Calsyn

George S Cary

Mark Leddy

Mark W Nelson

Abbott Laboratories, Air Liquide, Citigroup, Coca-Cola, Deutsche Telekom, Dow Chemical, GlaxoSmithKline, Google, HSBC, IMS Health, Keurig, Lafarge, Teladoc, Western Digital, Whirlpool

Outstanding

Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer

Jonathan Gleklen

22 partners

9 counsel

43 associates

Jonathan Gleklen

Richard L Rosen

AMC Theaters, AT&T, Boston Scientific, Cigna, Endo, General Electric, Kroger, Monsanto, Nucor, Philip Morris, Visa

Baker Botts

John Taladay

Stephen Weissman

15 partners

5 counsel

25 associates

Sean FX Boland

Paul C Cuomo

James F Rill

John Taladay

Arch Coal, Boehringer Ingelheim, Eaton, Halliburton, IATA, Liberty Media, Magna, McWane, Merck, Novartis, Philips Electronics, Qualcomm, Waste Management

Covington & Burling

Thomas O Barnett

Deborah A Garza

18 partners

6 counsel

12 associates

Thomas O Barnett

Deborah A Garza

Theodore Voorhees Jr

Alan M Wiseman

Allergan, Amazon, AstraZeneca, Citigroup, Disney, Keurig, JPMorgan Chase, National Football League, Samsung, Tribune Media, Union Pacific Railroad, Verizon

Dechert

Paul T Denis

6 partners

1 counsel

8 associates

Paul T Denis

Paul H Friedman

American Airlines, Albertsons, Berwind, B&G Foods, Curtis Circulation, CVS Health, Dean Foods, General Electric, Kellogg, Monsanto, National CineMedia, Ritchie Bros, WhiteWave

Gibson Dunn & Crutcher

Scott D Hammond

16 partners

4 counsel/of counsel

24 associates

D Jarrett Arp

Scott Hammond

Joseph Kattan

Joshua H Soven

Apple, Intel, Microsoft, UBS, Panasonic, Kimberly-Clark, BNSF Railway, McDonald’s, Aetna, AT&T, Marriott, LinkedIn, Hewlett Packard Enterprises, St Jude Medical, Energizer, Comcast, Moody’s, Sony, Southern Power, Tenet Healthcare, Uber

Outstanding

Hogan Lovells

Edith Ramirez

17 partners

14 associates

Logan M Breed

Janet L McDavid

J Robert Robertson

Advocate Health Care, Aeromexico, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Change Healthcare, Credit Suisse, Dell, OSF Healthcare, SABMiller

Jones Day

David Wales

25 partners

2 of counsel

25 associates

Kathryn M Fenton

Kenneth Field

John M Majoras

J Bruce McDonald

Phillip A Proger

Ryan C Thomas

David P Wales

Aetna, Carlyle, Cintas, Conagra, Deere & Company, Essilor, General Electric, HeidelbergCement, Indivior, Marathon, Newell, Potash Corp, Procter & Gamble, Rite Aid, Sanofi

Latham & Watkins

Amanda Reeves

9 partners

5 counsel

21 associates

Michael Egge

Amanda Reeves

Margaret Zwisler

Agrium, Avago, Barclays, Entercom, Nissan, Cox, Gavis Pharmaceuticals, FMC Technologies, Ocean Spray, Time Warner Cable, Siemens, Sumitomo Electric

Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom

Steven Sunshine

5 partners

3 counsel

17 associates

John M Nannes

Steven Sunshine

Energy Solutions, NXP Semiconductors, Nokia, SanDisk, Yahoo!, Intel, Air Products, Cavium, HP, Cisco, Plum Creek Timber, LANXESS, Bai Brands, Allergan, Corning International Kabushiki Kaisha

Weil Gotshal & Manges

Steven Newborn

10 partners

2 counsel

15 associates

Ann Malester

Steven Newborn

Abbott Laboratories, AbbVie, Allergan, BASF, Sanofi, Sherwin Williams, Signet Jewelers, Staples, TPG Capital, Walgreens Boots Alliance, Walmart, WEX

White & Case

J Mark Gidley

12 partners

7 counsel

32 associates

J Mark Gidley

Actavis (Allergan, Forest Laboratories and Warner Chilcott), Anthem, Boehringer Ingelheim, Dynegy, Haier, Icahn, Maruyasu, Nexans, Omnicare, Panasonic, Paddock Holdings Par Pharmaceutical, Toshiba, Upsher-Smith, Zimmer Biomet

Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati

Susan Creighton

7 partners

5 counsel

16 associates

Susan Creighton

Mark Rosman

Scott A Sher

Associated Wholesale Grocers, Brocade, FanDuel, Glenmark Generics Inc USA, Google, HP, Mylan, Pandora, T-Mobile USA, Salesforce.com, Spotify, Twitter, Verisign, Walgreens

Highly recommended

Axinn, Veltrop & Harkrider

John DeQ Briggs

4 partners

1 counsel

7 associates

John DeQ Briggs

AARC, Alvogen, Avaya, Ball Corporation, Danfoss, Dell, Google, HIG Capital, Hi-Touch Bus. Svc, IBC, McKesson, NIBE, Nishikawa Rubber, Silver Lake Partners, Stanley Black & Decker, Symantec Corporation, Thermo Fisher, Tyson Foods, UPMC, Yardi

Boies Schiller Flexner

William A Isaacson

9 partners

3 counsel

8 associates

Robert Cooper

James P Denvir III

Amy J Mauser

William A Isaacson

Apple, Animal Science Products, Carolinas Healthcare System, Costco, Delta Air Lines, International Construction Products, Sanford Health, SolarCity, Travis Kalanick

Crowell & Moring

Wm Randolph Smith

13 partners

11 counsel

12 associates

Wm Randolph Smith

AT&T, Blue Cross Blue Shield, Caledonia, Cardinal Health, CSX Transportation, DuPont, Humana, Owens & Minor, TransCanada, United Airlines, United Technologies

Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer

Paul Yde

4 partners

5 counsel

14 associates

Paul Yde

Thomas Ensign

Bruce McCulloch

Robert Schlossberg

Paul Yde

Air Methods, AmerisourceBergen, Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Carlson, Continental AG, Hachette, Hapag-Lloyd, Intel, Johnson & Johnson, London Stock Exchange, Novartis, PepsiCo, Rexam, Smiths, Spectra Energy, United Airlines

Hunton & Williams

D Bruce Hoffman

8 partners

4 of counsel

13 associates

D Bruce Hoffman

Cash-America International, Georgia-Pacific, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, Statoil, Chevron Corporation, Delhaize America, Rubycon Corporation, Diageo, GS Yuasa International, Capital One Financial Corp

Kirkland & Ellis

Not applicable

19 partners

7 counsel

6 associates

Mark L Kovner

Matthew J Reilly

Tim Muris

Accenture, 3G Capital Partners, Teva Pharmaceuticals, Tronox, Abbott Laboratories, Bain Capital, Vista Equity Partners, Boeing, BP, Delta Air Lines, Danaher, Infineon, Leap Wireless, Wellcare, Boehringer Ingelheim, Ranbaxy, ABB Optical

Mayer Brown

Mark W Ryan

10 partners

10 counsel

8 associates

None

Cargill, Nestlé, Virgin America, The Big Ten Conference, Philips, Blue Shield of California, Foster Farms, CDK Global

McDermott Will & Emery

Raymond A Jacobsen Jr

13 partners

1 counsel

7 associates

Raymond A Jacobsen Jr

Lockheed Martin, Steel Dynamics, American Gypsum Company, Mars, Dairy Farmers of America, TreeHouse Foods, Weyerhaeuser, ProMedica Health System, Constellation Brands, Amgen

Morgan Lewis & Bockius

Darren S Tucker

Hill Wellford

8 partners

1 of counsel

5 associates

John H Shenefield

Apollo Global Management, Google, Pfizer, Morgan Stanley & Co, ICAP, Qualcomm, Lupin Pharmaceuticals TDK Corporation, Perrigo Company, Verso Corporation

Morrison & Foerster

W Stephen Smith

Jeffrey Jaeckel

8 partners

1 counsel

4 associates

Roxann Henry

David L Meyer

W Stephen Smith

Amadeus, CSX, Intel, JPMorgan Chase, Norfolk Southern, ON Semiconductor, Sumitomo Electric, UPS, Boyd Gaming

Highly recommended

O'Melveny & Myers

Richard Parker

Ian Simmons

7 partners

3 counsel

10 associates

Richard Parker

Alaska Airlines, American Airlines/US Airways, Asiana Airlines, Bumble Bee Foods, Halliburton, Honeywell, Mitsui, Quest Diagnostics, Samsung Electronics, Top Rank

Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison

Kenneth Gallo

Charles (Rick) Rule

Joseph Simons

7 partners

2 counsel

29 associates

Kenneth Gallo

Charles (Rick) Rule

Joseph Simons

Air Methods, Cigna, Elanco, Eli Lilly, Mastercard, Microsoft, Mitel Networks, MLB Office of the Commissioner, Monsanto, News Corp, Sharp, Universal American

Simpson Thacher & Bartlett

Peter Thomas

4 partners

1 counsel

4 associates

None

Ahold, NXP Semiconductors, Priceline, CSL Ltd, Amgen, JPMorgan, TradeWeb, HCA, ISDA, Costar, ChemChina, Deutsche Bank, Holcim

Sidley Austin

William Blumenthal

11 partners

2 counsel

5 associates

William Blumenthal

James Lowe

AT&T, BorgWarner, Cabela's, Catalyst Paper, CBOE, Duke Energy, Exelon, Recall Holdings, Sigma-Aldrich, Welltower

Sullivan & Cromwell

Daryl A Libow

5 partners

12 counsel

12 associates

None

The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, BP, Diebold, Dyax, FXI Holdings, JPMorgan Chase & Co, Nomura, Solera Holdings, ING Group, Columbia Pipeline Group, FirstMerit Corporation, First Niagara Financial Group, Ace Limited, Scottrade, Tesoro, Praxair, British Airways, International Airlines Group

Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale
and Dorr

Thomas Mueller

11 partners

10 counsel

35 associates

Thomas Mueller

Hartmut Schneider

Baker Hughes, DENSO, ELNA, Envision Healthcare, International Paper, Jeffrey Glazer, NCAA, Panasonic, Regal, Rohan Ramchandani, Schaeffler

Recommended

Akin Gump Strauss Huer & Feld

Paul Hewitt

7 partners

2 counsel

6 associates

None

7-Eleven, VCA, Daimler Trucks North America, Charter Communications, Methodist LeBonheur Healthcare, Vizio, McKee Foods, Direct Selling Association, Amplifon

Allen & Overy

John Terzaken

2 partners

8 associates

None

Bosch, Deutsche Bank, Mercuria Energy Trading Group, Tri-Union Seafoods, United Airlines

BakerHostetler

Robert Abrams

10 partners

1 counsel

4 associates

None

Caterpillar, Commonwealth Brands, Dairy Farmer Milk Cases, Funai Electric Co, HP, Lam Group, Makita USA, National Association of Animal Breeders, Nippon Cargo Airlines Co, NYK Line North America, The Aluminum Association, ThyssenKrupp, TOTE, Yusen Logistics (Americas) Inc

Baker McKenzie

Mark Hamer

3 partners

2 counsel

1 associates

None

Okaya Electric Industries, AUO Monitorship, Canpotex Limited, American Natural Soda Ash Corp, Veolia Environment, Archer-Daniels-Midland Company, FedEx, Safran, Meiji Yasuda Life Insurance Company, Brunswick Corporation, Daimler AG, CHS, Knorr-Bremse, Clarcor

Cooley

Jacqueline Grise

3 partners

2 counsel

8 associates

M Howard Morse

Marc G Schildkraut

Patheon, Alarm.com, Meredith, Tesoro, Rovi, Uber, Horizon Pharma, Medivation, Prasco, ATPCO, Hawaiian Airlines, Snyder’s-Lance and Sazerac

Davis Polk & Wardwell

Michael N Sohn

Jon Leibowitz

Jesse Solomon

3 partners

1 counsel

7 associates

Michael N Sohn

Jon Leibowitz

BATS Global Markets, Biotie Therapies Corp, China Resources Beer, ConAgra Foods, Cooper Gay Swett & Crawford, Emerson Electric, Shire, Smith & Nephew, Solvay, SS&C Technologies Holdings, Syngenta, Volkswagen Truck & Bus, Zuffa LLC

Fried Frank Harris Shriver & Jacobson

Bernard A Nigro Jr (until August 2017)

2 partners

2 associates

Bernard A Nigro Jr

AEA Investors and Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan, Boulder Brands, Genesys, Goldman Sachs Asset Management, Goldman Sachs Merchant Banking, Media General, T Rad Co, ProQuest, Permira, Baring Private Equity Asia

Hughes Hubbard & Reed

William J Kolasky

2 partners

1 counsel

4 associates

William J Kolasky

Portigon, WestdeutschImmobilien Bank, MediaNews Group (dba Digital First Media), Cantor Fitzgerald, Claris, Republic Airlines, Brambles, Cars.com

Recommended

Ropes & Gray

Mark S Popofsky

4 partners

11 associates

Mark S Popofsky

Hitachi-LG Data Storage, Shire, Synageva BioPharma, Bain Capital Investors, Welsh Carson, Anderson & Stowe

Steptoe & Johnson

Ed Schwartz

4 partners

2 of counsel

2 associates

None

LG Chem, Netflix,National Milk Producers Federation, Republic Services, Federal Express, PHRMA, Rockwell Collins,McCain Foods, Amadeus, Japan Airlines, Western Union

Venable

Lisa Jose Fales

16 partners

6 counsel

8 associates

None

Sun Pharmaceuticals Industries, Ltd. (formerly Ranbaxy) and Sun Pharmaceutical Industries, Inc., Taro Pharmaceuticals USA, Inc. and Taro Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd, Impax Laboratories, Inc, Perdue Farms, Inc, Guthy Renker

Vinson & Elkins

Craig P Seebald

6 partners

10 associates

None

Southwest Airlines, Maxell Corporation of America; Hitachi Maxell Ltd; Hitachi Automotive Systems Americas, Inc; Dart Container Corporation and Solo Cup Company

Williams & Connolly

John E Schmidtlein

Jonathan B Pitt

10 partners

10 associates

None

Dairy Farmers of America, AstraZeneca, Fox Broadcasting Company and Big Ten Network Services, Blue Sky Studios, Takata Corporation, Google, Par Pharmaceuticals, Bank of America, Merrill Lynch Fenner Pierce & Smith, Celgene Corporation, 21st Century Fox

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