Joseph Tringali

Joseph Tringali is a partner at Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP in the litigation department, where he has represented clients on general commercial litigation with an emphasis on antitrust matters. He has represented plaintiffs and defendants in jury and bench trials and argued appeals in federal and state appellate courts in diverse areas including antitrust, breach of contract, copyright infringement, false advertising, employment discrimination and civil rights. Primarily, he has litigated antitrust actions on behalf of both plaintiffs and defendants and counsels clients under the Sherman, Clayton, Robinson-Patman and Hart-Scott-Rodino Acts including cases alleging monopolisation, price fixing and other restraints of trade, and price discrimination. He has also handled numerous merger transactions before the Department of Justice, the Federal Trade Commission, various state antitrust enforcement agencies, and the European Commission including representing Blackstone in its proposed acquisition of Hilton Hotels, Gerdau Ameristeel in its proposed acquisition of Chaparral, KeySpan in its acquisition by National Grid, and Kmart in its acquisition of Sears. In addition, he has represented Kohlberg Kravis Roberts in a civil antitrust action alleging collusion among private equity firms, MasterCard in antitrust actions brought against it by rivals American Express and Discover, Weyerhaeuser in several monopolisation cases regarding alder lumber, and Lehman Brothers and JP Morgan Chase in a lawsuit alleging price fixing regarding the fee charged in certain IPOs. He has been recognised in the antitrust field by the following publications: Chambers USA 2007, The Legal 500, The International Who's Who of Competition Lawyers, and the Guide to the World's Leading Competition and Antitrust Lawyers.

Mr Tringali joined the firm in 1983 and became a partner in 1989. He received his BA from Wesleyan University in 1977 and his JD from the New York University School of Law in 1980, where he was an editor of the Law Review.