GCR 100 - 17th Edition

Germany

10 January 2017

Germany

An active and sophisticated enforcer, overseeing Europe’s largest economy and willing to disagree with both its own government and international counterparts, has kept German competition lawyers busy.

Elite

Once again, CLEARY GOTTLIEB STEEN & HAMILTON is among the top competition practices in Germany. By number of Germany-based partners, Cleary’s practice is the smallest of the firms featured in the Elite band, but the expertise of the team dominates that of much larger groups. Romina Polley and veteran Dirk Schroeder steer the practice from the firm’s Cologne office, though the group lacks formal leadership. The Cologne team frequently works on both German and European matters, and interacts closely with Cleary’s top-rated Brussels practice. Stephan Barthelmess, a partner until January 2016 who is now a senior counsel, splits his time between Brussels and Frankfurt. Till Müller-Ibold also became a senior counsel in January 2016 – and the firm hired Bernd Langeheine, formerly deputy director-general for mergers at the European Commission, as a senior consultant in September 2015.

In merger control, the team is frequently tapped to handle large-scale international work. Schroeder and counsel Tilman Kuhn, alongside colleagues in Brussels and Washington, DC, are lead counsel to the Dow Chemical Company during its merger of equals with DuPont. The European Commission’s Directorate-General for Competition opened a Phase II investigation of the deal in 2016. Shroder also represented Dow as it restructured the Dow Corning Corporation to become a full owner of the joint venture; the deal closed in June 2016. Polley, meanwhile, represented Samsonite in its US$1.8 billion acquisition of premium business, travel and lifestyle products and accessories manufacturing brand Tumi Holdings.

Much of Cleary’s work on the behavioural side remains confidential. Schroeder represented Deutsche Telekom during a DG Comp abuse of dominance investigation; the telecoms operator was ultimately fined for an alleged strategy to push competitors out of the broadband market, and received a second fine for repeat offences. Schroeder has represented the company in an appeal against that decision. Kuhn worked with Brussels partner Romano Subiotto QC in Lundbeck’s appeal against DG Comp’s first pay-for-delay decision; the General Court dismissed the company’s challenge against the controversial decision in 2016.

Other lawyers consistently cite the large team at FRESHFIELDS BRUCKHAUS DERINGER, split among offices in Düsseldorf, Cologne and Berlin, as a market leader. The German practice is one of the firm’s best, with nine partners since it promoted Katrin Gassner in Düsseldorf in 2016. A testament to Freshfields’ strength is its roster of household-name clients, which includes the likes of Air Berlin, Chiquita, E.ON, Liberty Global, Mars and Siemens.

Complex international merger clearance is a clear focus for the team. Recently, it acted for Boehringer Ingelheim in DG Comp’s investigation of a €22 billion asset swap with Sanofi, which the enforcer conditionally cleared in Phase I in 2016. Elsewhere, Berlin partner Helmut Bergmann acted for Coty during its US$12.5 billion acquisition of parts of Procter & Gamble’s beauty, fragrance and hair care business. The German practice also represented Ardagh on the acquisition of assets from Ball and Rexam.

Contentious and behavioural work also keeps the Freshfields group busy. The practice represented Russian search engine Yandex in a complaint to the EU against Google. Partners Thomas Lübbig in Berlin and Peter Chrocziel in Munich acted for Genentech during a tough European Court of Justice case. The firm bagged immunity for Linpac in the DG Comp food packaging investigation, and represents several clients in DG Comp and German auto parts investigations. In follow-on damages, the team acts for ABB, Infineon, Mars, Pfleiderer, Solvay and ThyssenKrupp in a slew of cases.

The 44-strong competition practice at GLEISS LUTZ is one of two traditionally German firms in our Elite band. The team features 10 partners, led by Ingo Brinker, who splits his time between Munich and Brussels. He and six other partners are nominated to Who’s Who Legal: Competition. Iris Benedikt-Buckenleib became a counsel in January 2016.

While the firm is rooted in Germany, it takes on a huge amount of international work. To name but a few recent German cartel matters, Gleiss Lutz defended companies involved in cartels between garage makers, grocery retailers, wallpaper manufacturers, sugar sellers and china manufacturers. At the European level, the team acted for Daimler in the DG Comp trucks investigation, and bagged a landmark judgment on behalf of Schwenk Zement and HeidelbergCement at the European Court of Justice that restricted the EU enforcer’s investigative powers. Wolfgang Bosch acted for SKF, one of five auto parts companies fined a total of €953 million in 2014, and Brinker and Munich partner Petra Linsmeier represented Infineon in DG Comp’s smart card chip cartel probe.

The firm has also been involved in innovative German and European merger control work. It acted for Markant during a challenge against ministerial authorisation for the Edeka/Kaiser’s Tengelmann supermarket deal, which had overturned a Federal Cartel Office (FCO) prohibition decision. Brinker, alongside a Brussels team led by counsel Christian von Köckritz, acted for all three parties in a cross-border music licensing joint venture among PRS for Music, STIM and GEMA – the music licensing organisations for Britain, Sweden and Germany respectively. The European Commission approved the deal in 2015. Gleiss has also had a major role in one of 2016’s massive agribusiness deals: the competition team acts for Syngenta during its €43 billion acquisition by ChemChina, and is coordinating global filings outside North America.

Its rivals say HENGELER MUELLER, one of two German firms in the Elite band, is at the top of its competition law game. Düsseldorf partner Alf-Henrik Bischke says the practice has been “thriving” recently, frequently working with Brussels colleagues to handle cross-jurisdictional matters. Over the years, the competition group has become a true stand-alone team within the firm, while still providing valuable support to M&A colleagues. Six partners make up the team, which has acted for clients such as E.ON, Kabel Deutschland, MAN Group, Microsoft, RWE, Siemens and Volkswagen.

The past two years have seen a slew of large merger control matters at Hengeler. Düsseldorf partner Thorsten Mäger acted for K+S as it fought an €8 billion takeover by the Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan. He also represented Bayer as it sold its diabetes care business to Panasonic. Bischke has represented several Chinese clients during European inbound investment.

On the behavioral side, Christoph Stadler represented online hotel booking platform HRS during its tangles with the Federal Cartel Office, and continues to act the company during ongoing hotel booking proceedings across Europe. Bishke, alongside Brussels partner Hans-Jörg Niemeyer, has represented a Japanese client in the EU leg of the global capacitors cartel investigation. Litigation specialist Thomas Paul has acted for British Airways, Akzo Nobel and Nordzucker in claims following from the air cargo, bleach and sugar cartels, and continues to represent clients in the TV advertising, coffee and detergents sectors.

CMS HASCHE SIGLE has become increasingly visible on the market over the last few years, observers say. The large group includes 12 partners and five counsel spread across offices in Frankfurt, Stuttgart, Munich, Hamburg and Düsseldorf, and a Brussels contingent of German lawyers that includes two partners, one of counsel and one counsel. In January 2016, Roland Wiring became a partner and Christof Soltau and Nantje Johnston became counsel.

In CMS’s highest-profile engagement, Telefónica turned to partners Michael Bauer in Brussels and Jens Neitzel in Munich for merger control advice during its €8.5 billion acquisition of E-Plus. Displaying the firm’s experience across multiple areas, the advice involved representation before the FCO and European Commission, as well as Germany’s telecoms regulator, to secure clearance of the four-to-three deal. The team continues to act for Telefónica during various proceedings. Partner Tim Reher represents Jägermeister and confectionery makers August Storck and Goldeck, in pursuing follow-on damages against members of the German sugar cartel; he also defends Electrolux against such claims for its role in the refrigeration compressors cartel. Harald Kahlenberg acts for LBBW, Helaba and Deutscher Sparkassenverbrand in FCO merger proceedings regarding their participation in Paydirekt, a new online payment system.

“Clients come to us when they want brainpower, rather than manpower,” says Markus M Wirtz, a highly rated partner at leading Düsseldorf boutique GLADE MICHEL WIRTZ. Several rivals say the firm has been a key driver in boosting the competitiveness of the German competition bar. Wirtz is joined by highly rated partner Silke Möller, counsel Christian Karbaum, and four associates. Wirtz, alongside counsel Christian Karbaum, represented Deutsche Telekom during its challenge to the Kabel BW and Liberty Global merger, which the FCO approved with conditions in 2011. Düsseldorf’s Higher Regional Court reversed the approval in 2013, and Deutsche Telekom and Liberty eventually settled. Möller acted for Bohai Leasing as it acquired Avalon Holdings, an aircraft leasing company, with Sidley Austin in London on the other side of the deal.

As a sign of the team’s ability to handle seriously complex cases, Wirtz and Karbaum represent Samsung Electronics in its defence against patent assertion entity Unwired Planet, which has brought patent infringement lawsuits against the company and several others in Germany and the UK. Most of the patents involved in the case are standard-essential, bringing in important and complicated competition law issues. Further top-drawer clients include Deutsche Bank, Electronic Arts, Epson, Red Bull, Total, United Internet and Xerox.

The Hamburg and Frankfurt-based team at LATHAM & WATKINS prides itself on its close integration with the firm’s Brussels office, says German practice leader Marco Núñez Müller. The German practice is a key part of Latham’s worldwide strategy to be a one-stop shop for companies requiring global competition advice. Six partners make up the senior German team – boosted by the recent addition of former Freshfields partner Michael Esser, who splits his time between Düsseldorf and Brussels. Jana Dammann de Chapto became a counsel in Hamburg in October 2015. Latham global antitrust co-chair Sven Völcker practises from Brussels, and Hanno Kaiser is based in San Francisco.

A large Latham team represents Facebook in the FCO’s ongoing abuse of dominance investigation of the company, which involves novel issues about the interface between market power and possible data protection infringements. Volker Schäfer and Christine Gaertner act for Singapore Airlines Cargo and Singapore Airlines in German air cargo follow-on claims. Latham represented private equity group Carlyle – a long-time client – in its US$1.9 billion acquisition of Veyance, which the FCO cleared after a Phase II probe. Georg Weidenbach acted for WhatsApp during its acquisition by Facebook.

LINKLATERS is praised by peers for its strong merger control work, which has traditionally been towards the top of the pack in Germany. But the firm’s practice encompasses all areas of competition law – it has recently dealt with dawn raids on a near-monthly basis, and is involved in practically every major German antitrust case. Düsseldorf-based Daniela Seeliger leads the team and is widely respected by Germany’s competition bar.

Düsseldorf partner Carsten Grave is part of a large Linklaters team representing Deutsche Börse during its planned takeover of the London Stock Exchange; DG Comp started a Phase II investigation of the deal in September 2016. The deal, if cleared, is set to create Europe’s largest exchange. Seeliger has advised SPX subsidiary Balcke-Dürr on damages claims.

The team at OPPENLÄNDER, split between Munich and Stuttgart and headed by Albrecht Bach, is often cited as one of the country’s top competition litigation firms – but Bach is keen to emphasise that the team is well rounded, with behavioural investigations and merger control strengths too. A recent highlight has been the representation of EnBW Energie Baden-Württemberg as the energy company sought access to DG Comp documents linked to the gas-insulated switchgear cartel. In a landmark 2014 decision, the ECJ held there is a general presumption that cartel documents should be confidential – but added that specific documents can be made available at DG Comp’s discretion. Otherwise, the firm can be found in many of Germany’s most significant antitrust litigation matters, in areas as diverse as cathode ray tubes, automotive bearings and fittings.

The firm was also involved in the FCO’s recent prefabricated garages investigation, acting for the country’s second-largest manufacturer. In merger control, Bach and partner Ulrich Klumpp represented German publishing company Verlagsgruppe Georg von Holtzbrinck as it set up a joint venture with Springer Science and Business Media. The deal included filings at the European Commission, the US and several other jurisdictions, including the Comesa Competition Commission. Partner Ulrich Klumpp acted for Eurosport and its parent Discovery Communications on its acquisition of live broadcast rights for the German football league Bundesliga.

Mannheim-based SZA SCHILLING ZUTT & ANSCHÜTZ now features two partners, two counsel and four associates. The team has represented clients in a number of FCO cartel matters, including in its automotive parts, fast-moving consumer goods, construction, wallpaper and cement investigations. Highlights include bagging Reinert as a client in the sausage cartel, Erzquell Brauerei in the beer cartel, and ZG Raiffeisen in several agricultural products cartel probes. In mergers, the firm acted for Fuchs Petrolub during FCO proceedings linked to the acquisition of Statoil Fuel & Retail Lubricants, and for the majority shareholders of Dr Haas during a Phase II FCO investigation of an attempted hostile takeover of the company.

On the European side, SZA represents Hansa Armaturen before the European Court of Justice as part of the bathroom fittings cartel investigation – the court looks set to create precedents tied to questions around the highest fines that can be imposed on single-product companies and medium-sized companies. Private litigation has been a growth area; the firm’s defence of Vossloh Group against a follow-on damages claim by Deutsche Bahn, which seeks €850 million for the company’s involvement in the railway track cartel, has been a highlight. Vossloh has also turned to SZA in its defence against more than 30 proceedings initiated by metropolitan and suburban commuter railway companies, following the company’s part in the railway track and turnout cartels. Reckitt Benckiser is another key litigation client.

Unusually for a German competition practice within an international firm, the WILMER CUTLER PICKERING HALE AND DORR team is not attached to a substantial M&A practice, says partner Stefan Ohlhoff, co-chair of the firm’s EU regulatory group. Instead, he and practice leader Ulrich Quack have created a true stand-alone team, which aims to be a “destination practice” in Germany for clients that need tough work done – though German staffers frequently work alongside US and Brussels colleagues. The approach has paid off: WilmerHale has developed into one of Germany’s top private enforcement practices.

Deutsche Bahn is a headline client. Quack and Ohlhoff are advising the company on all aspects of its follow-on claims seeking to recover damages from members of the railway track cartel. The team is also adept at handling defence work, with Deutsche Lufthansa as another key client. Since early 2014, partner Hans-Georg Kamann and special counsel Peter Gey have advised the company as it defends itself against lawsuits linked to its involvement in the air cargo cartel. Ohlhoff also acts for Deutsche Telekom, which faces lawsuits for alleged abuse of dominance. It would be a mistake, however, to think of WilmerHale’s German team as a one-trick pony; merger control and cartel defence continue to be pillars of the practice. Partner Jan Heithecker and special counsel Oliver Fleischmann continue to provide worldwide merger control advice to BC Partners as it sets up a joint venture with Springer Science and Business Media. Gey represents Schaeffler in DG Comp’s bearings cartel probe, alongside Brussels partner Christian Duvernoy.

BAKER & MCKENZIE’s German practice head Christian Horstkotte frequently advises major client Deutsche Bahn on merger control and abuse of dominance matters. On the contentious side, Carlsberg turned to the firm during the FCO’s beer cartel investigation. Munich-based verticals expert Katharina Spenner represented sportswear company Asics, as the company faced FCO proceedings over its online distribution practices – the enforcer has referred to that matter as a “pilot case”. The team has also been involved in defending Mondelez and Eckes-Granini against follow-on claims tied to their involvement in the sugar cartel. Unusually, the firm also has an in-house economics team, which it says allows it to offer a one-stop-shop for legal and economic advice; Mondelez and Eckes-Granini are two such clients that the firm is assisting in this way.

CLIFFORD CHANCE prides itself on developing close relationships with long-term clients, says practice head Joachim Schütze. Based in Düsseldorf, the practice includes Schütze and Marc Besen. One dedicated counsel and seven associates round out the team, which stays in close contact with German speakers based in the firm’s Paris office. Schütze’s strategy has paid off: in recent years, the firm has frequently advised blue-chips such as Bayer, BNP Paribas, BASF, Deutsche Telekom, EADS, and L’Oréal. Pfizer tapped the team to handle its US$160 billion merger with Allergan, which was ultimately abandoned on non-antitrust grounds. Clifford Chance also represented Metro during the FCO’s food retail investigation.

All four partners at competition boutique COMMEO – created in 2010 by the departure of Baker & McKenzie’s German competition team – are Who’s Who Legal: Competition nominees. Commeo may be small overall, but compared to its rivals in Frankfurt, the four-partner, one-counsel, five-associate firm is a large one, with a particular focus on contentious and behavioural matters. Recent highlights include defending participants in the ball bearings and refrigeration compressors cartels against damage claims, and acting for the German Publisher and Bookseller Association in bringing an abuse of dominance complaint against Amazon to the FCO. Partner Stephanie Pautke has particular expertise in pharmaceuticals, and the firm has worked for CSL, Abbott, Mundipharma, Asklepios and AbbVie. Partner Jörg-Martin Schultze steered long-standing client Magna’s €550 million sale of its interior business to Grupo Antolin, which involved EU, Mexican, Chinese and South Korean filings; Johanna Kübler, meanwhile, acted for Sika during DG Comp merger proceedings tied to a possible hostile takeover by rival Saint-Gobain.

The DENTONS practice has gained traction over the past couple of years, says German competition head Jörg Karenfort. This has been reflected in the firm’s recent work: it represents Gazprom in the headline-grabbing DG Comp abuse of dominance investigation. Karenfort coordinates Dentons’ work for Gazprom, which involves work across the firm’s Berlin, Brussels, Paris, Warsaw, Budapest and Prague offices. Karenfort and counsel Josef Hainz act for the Federal Association of German Banks in the FCO’s online payments proceedings. The firm also has a hand in some interesting – but confidential – cartel matters. 2016 saw the lateral hires of partner Matthias Nordmann from Norton Rose Fulbright, and René Grafunder from Linklaters.

The competition team at FIELDFISHER is a relatively new one, formed when Christian Bahr and Sascha Dethof joined from SBR Schuster Berger Bahr Ahrens in 2014. Both are based in Düsseldorf; Hamburg partner Michael Adam also practises competition law. The team focuses on investigations and private enforcement, says Dethof. Many of the firm’s competition clients are confidential, but the team has been involved in several of the FCO’s recent cartel probes – including those into meat and sausages, potatoes, beer, the automotive sector, cutlery and heat exchanges. The team has represented Carl Fuhr in a General Court appeal against the European Commission’s window fittings cartel fine.

Two-partner Cologne competition boutique HEINZ & ZAGROSEK is still new to the market, having only started operating in June 2015, but the individuals who make up the firm’s partnership have bags of experience. Both Who’s Who Legal: Competition nominee Silke Heinz and partner Roman Zagrosek are Cleary Gottlieb alumni, and the German bar has high expectations for the well-rated pair. Zagrosek, who was a sole practitioner after leaving Cleary, previously cooperated with other law firms to advise on merger control and litigation. Most of the new firm’s work is confidential, but it operates across a wide range of matters – including advice linked to digital markets and information sharing – and has picked up blue-chip clients like Axel Springer.

HOGAN LOVELLS has competition partners in each of its three German offices – Düsseldorf, Hamburg and Munich – and has recently picked up several interesting cases, say partners Martin Sura and Marc Schweda. Indeed, the team has attracted and retained a raft of high-profile clients such as Alstom, Axel Springer, BlackBerry, ExxonMobil, Moët Hennessy and Mitsubishi. Unusually, it has also served the FCO itself, when Schweda persuaded Cologne’s Regional Court to throw out a €1.1 billion case by Danish hearing aid manufacturer GN Store Nord, which alleged the enforcer wrongly blocked the sale of one of its business units to a rival. The Düsseldorf Higher Regional Court dismissed an appeal against the decision by GN Store Nord in 2014. Partner Christoph Wünschmann acted for Air Canada in German air cargo follow-on proceedings, alongside Falk Schöning, who became a partner in 2016. Schweda and counsel Jan Christian Eggers represented Lego in FCO resale price maintenance proceedings; the company received a €130,000 fine.

The JONES DAY German team, says Düsseldorf partner Johannes Zöttl, prides itself on its international focus, and close integration with the firm’s practices abroad. Led by Carsten Gromotke and split between Düsseldorf and Frankfurt, much of the firm’s recent work has a cross-border element. It is complemented by Brussels partner Philipp Werner, who joined the firm from McDermott Will & Emery; Thomas Jestaedt divides his time between Brussels and Frankfurt. Zöttl represented Baxalta during its €32 billion merger with Shire; Jones Day’s Düsseldorf office handled global coordination of the deal. Gromotke, meanwhile, handled the non-US coordination of the global Electrolux/GE deal; Electrolux’s proposed acquisition of the WMF group; and its proposed acquisition ofa European coffee appliances business. Zöttl has also represented an auto parts supplier in the German leg of the global auto parts probe.

KING & WOOD MALLESONS has a small but busy team based in Munich and led by partner Tilman Siebert, complemented by one associate. Brussels veteran Martin Bechtold came from Allen & Overy in 2014, but joined Eversheds in 2016. The firm has a host of longstanding private equity clients, and corporate partners often turn to Tilman and his team for assistance with merger review. Beyond deals, which Siebert estimates take around 40% of his time, the team has picked up increasing amounts of behavioural work, such as representing Qantas in ongoing German air cargo follow-on proceedings. Siebert and his team are part of a King & Wood Mallesons cross-border group acting for Expedia in the hotel booking investigations. The German team also advises the company on civil litigation.

LUTHER has a strong reputation in behavioural work and litigation. The firm has ties to Germany’s automotive, distribution and energy sectors, which partner Anne Wegner says are the “pillars” of the practice. Thomas Kapp and Brussels-based Helmut Janssen represent fittings manufacturer Dornbracht in European and German appeals against a fine for its role in the fittings cartel. Knorr-Bremse is a regular client that Wegner has advised on its acquisition of GT Group, which involved filings worldwide and coordination of Austrian and UK notification; the deal closed in June 2016. Kapp represents one of Germany’s largest paper wholesalers in defending against follow-on litigation brought by 115 printers; a 2016 settlement saw the firm’s client pay less than 5% of the amount the claimants initially sought. Düsseldorf partners Holger Stappert and Guido Jansen have represented a stainless steel manufacturer in FCO cartel proceedings, and have acted for Carcoustics International during an FCO dawn raid and subsequent cartel investigation.

Alexander Rinne is the only competition partner at MILBANK TWEED HADLEY & MCCLOY in Germany. But despite the small size of Milbank’s practice – consisting of one partner, one special counsel and three associates in total – the firm continues to have a strong presence. Other lawyers speak highly of Rinne, who says German and European work take up roughly equal amounts of his time. ProSiebenSat.1 Media is a frequent client: Rinne advises it in merger control proceedings and provides strategic advice on compliance and internal investigations. He has led for Brugg Kabel in its General Court bid to have its DG Comp fine for its role in the power cables cartel overturned. The firm also has a hand in several damages claims linked to the sugar cartel, including for clients DMK Deutsches Milchkontor, FrieslandCampina and the Mueller Group.

NOERR has become increasingly visible on the market, rivals say, and several large companies recently have approached the firm for complex work. Partner Alexander Birnstiel assisted Daimler in multi-jurisdictional merger control in its joint venture with Russian truck company Kamaz. Birnstiel and Munich-based Sebastian Janka represented SKW Stahl-Metallurgie in its challenge of DG Comp’s decision in the calcium carbide cartel; the European Court of Justice rejected it in June 2016. The firm also has a slew of private enforcement mandates; its work there includes acting for SAS in air cargo follow-on proceedings, a truck manufacturer in a possible follow-on case, and Cemex in ongoing German damages proceedings in which CDC is the claimant.

OSBORNE CLARKE has come a long way, playing to its strength in competition litigation, though practice head Thomas Funke is keen to stress that the firm is also highly skilled in merger control and more traditional behavioural work. “What sets us apart is the private enforcement mandates,” Funke says. The team’s plaintiff work for Cartel Damages Claims has been precedent-setting: in May 2015, during the special purpose vehicle’s litigation against Akzo, the ECJ clarified rules regarding where claimants can file claims against members of pan-European cartels. Acting for REWE Group, Osborne Clarke also won a case before Germany’s Supreme Court, which ordered the FCO to disclose documents in order to facilitate follow-on claims. Funke acted for a leniency applicant in an FCO investigation, and an online payment provider in a separate German probe. The team also persuaded DG Comp to drop a case against an automotive components manufacturer suspected of being part of a global cartel.

Firm

Head(s) of competition

Size

Who’s Who Legal nominees

Clients

Elite

Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton

N/A

4 partners

2 senior counsel

2 counsel

1 senior consultant

19 associates

Romina Polley

Dirk Schroeder

Air Liquide, Baxter, Coca-Cola, Dow Chemical Company, Deutsche Telekom, DuPont, GlaxoSmithKline, Huawei, UTC, Whirlpool

Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer

Martin Klusmann

9 partners

4 senior consultants/
of counsel

2 counsel

39 senior associates and associates

8 transaction support lawyers

Helmut Bergmann

Uta Itzen

Tobias Klose

Martin Klusmann

Thomas Lübbig

Peter Niggemann

Burkhard Richter

Frank Röhling

Gerhard Wiedemann

ABB, Continental, Deutsche Bahn, E.ON, Lanxess, Mars, REWE, Schaeffler, Tchibo, ThyssenKrupp, VW, Wincor Nixdorf

Gleiss Lutz

Ingo Brinker

10 partners

2 counsel

12 associated partners

19 associates

1 of counsel

Rainer Bechtold

Wolfgang Bosch

Ingo Brinker

Ulrich Denzel

Matthias Karl

Petra Linsmeier

Christian Steinle

Siemens, Bayer, Bosch, HeidelbergCement, Deutsche Telekom, Evonik, Sasol, AB SKF, Federal Mogul, Infineon, MunichRe, ProSiebenSat.1 Media, voestalpine

Hengeler Mueller

N/A

6 partners

Alf-Henrik Bischke

Jochen Burrichter

Thorsten Mäger

Christoph Stadler

Akzo Nobel, Bombardier, British Airways, MAN Group, KKR, RWE, Siemens, Thermo Fisher, Webasto, Greiner Perfoam, Grohe

Highly recommended

CMS Hasche Sigle

Harald Kahlenberg

12 partners

5 counsel

6 senior associates

9 associates

Harald Kahlenberg

Clariant, GE, Volkswagen, LBBW, Westfleisch, Telefónica, Meda, Alstom, Allianz, Colgate, BP, Siemens, Yamaha

Glade Michel Wirtz

N/A

2 partners

1 counsel

4 associates

Markus M Wirtz

Danish Crown, Deutsche Bank, Deutsche Telekom, Electronic Arts, Haniel, Henkel, LVMH, Total, Red Bull, Samsung, United Internet, Xerox

Latham & Watkins

Marco Núñez Müller

6 partners

9 associates

Michael Esser

Georg Weidenbach

Siemens, Daimler, Facebook, Fresenius, ArcelorMittal, Nestlé, Liberty Global, Henkel, Rolly Royce Power Systems, Sumitomo Electric

Linklaters

Daniela Seeliger

5 partners

3 counsel

1 of counsel

20 managing associates

Carsten Grave

Daniela Seeliger

Deutsche Bahn, GoodMils, Gigaset, Deutsche Post, Tata, Nestlé, Deutsche Börse, BayWa, Fresenius Medical Care, Allianz Global Investors, UniCredit

Oppenländer

Albrecht Bach

5 partners

2 associated partners

4 associates

Albrecht Bach

Andreas Hahn

GSK Consumer Health, Metro AG, EnBW Energie Baden-Württemberg, Association of German Savings Banks, Georg von Holtzbrinck, Israel Electric Corporation, STEAG, Emil Frey Gruppe

SZA Schilling Zutt & Anschütz

Hans-Joachim Hellmann

2 partners

2 counsel

4 associates

Hans-Joachim Hellmann

Reinert, Erzquell Brauerei, Vossloh Group, Reckitt Benckiser, Airbus, Fuchs Petrolub, Mitsubishi Gas Chemical, Allegion, Glatfelter

Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr

Ulrich Quack

2 partners

2 counsel

4 associates

Hans Georg Kamann

Stefan Ohlhoff

Ulrich Quack

Deutsche Bahn, Deutsche Lufthansa, Deutsche Telekom, Schaeffler, BC Partners, Wintershall Holding, MKS Instruments, Danaher

Recommended

Baker & McKenzie

Christian Horstkotte

7 partners

Christian Horstkotte

Daimler, Hochtief, Deutsche Bahn, Knorr-Bremse, Carlsberg, Segafredo, Rewe, ASICS

Clifford Chance

Joachim Schütze

2 partners

1 counsel

7 associates

Marc Besen

Joachim Schütze

BASF, Bayer Group, Coca-Cola, Deutsche Telekom, General Electric, KONE, Metro, Pfizer, Volkswagen

Commeo

N/A

4 partners

1 counsel

5 associates

Johanna Kübler

Stephanie Pautke

Jörg-Martin Schultze

Dominique S Wagener

Procter & Gamble, Samsung, UVEX, Vaillant Group, SMA Solar, VDMA

Dentons

Jörg Karenfort

2 partners

3 counsel

5 associates

Jörg Karenfort

Fresenius Medical Care, Bundesverband Deutscher Banken Bankenverband, EMC, Gazprom, Unity Media Kabel, Deutsche Bahn, Coca-Cola Erfrischungsgetränke, Tipico

Fieldfisher

Christian Bahr

Sascha Dethof

3 partners

3 associates

Christian Bahr

Carl Fuhr, Canon, Olympus, Wacom, Verband Forschender Arzneimittelhersteller

Heinz & Zagrosek

Silke Heinz

2 partners

Silke Heinz

Axel Springer, GfK, Masco, Media Broadcast, Roto

Hogan Lovells

Martin Sura

4 partners

1 counsel

4 senior associates

6 associates

Martin Sura

Air Canada, Alcoa, Bertelsmann, BMW, the FCO, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Corning, Dell, Deutsche Telekom, Ford, Lego, ZTE

Jones Day

Carsten Gromotke

5 partners

Carsten Gromotke

Johannes Zöttl

Baxalta, Blackstone Group, Electrolux, Gazprom, Goldman Sachs, Randstad, Sanof-Aventis, SAP, Toyota, Volkswagen

King & Wood Mallesons

Tilman Siebert

1 partner

1 counsel

1 associate

None

Expedia, Qantas, Grupo Antolín, Chengdu Techcent Environment Gruppe

Luther

Thomas Kapp

6 partners

2 counsel

4 senior associates

1 associate

Thomas Kapp

Anne Caroline Wegner

Carcoustics, TBNE, Dornbracht, Knorr-Bremse, Klinikum Friedrichshafen,

Milbank Tweed Hadley & McCloy

Alexander Rinne

1 partner

1 special counsel

3 associates

Alexander Rinne

Alois Dallmayr, Bilfinger, Brugg Kabel, Husqvarna, PepsiCo, Sky Deutschland, Telefónica Germany

Noerr

Alexander Birnstiel

17 partners

18 associates

Alexander Birnstiel

Karsten Metzlaff

Kathrin Westermann

Cemex, Daimler, Deutsche Telekom, Johnson Controls, Ineos, Fresenius, Robert Bosch, ThyssenKrupp, Volkswagen

Osborne Clarke

Thomas Funke

4 partners

4 senior associates

5 associates

Thomas Funke

REWE, Audatex, Giropay, Grifols, Tech Mahindra, TecAlliance, Wolff & Müller

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